Watch VWs electric ID R crush the Nürburgring EV lap record

first_img 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Preview • Volkswagen I.D. Buzz: Driving this concept gets us smiling Volkswagen 3:28 The record-breaking Volkswagen I.D. R electric car It was all but a given that VW and driver Romain Dumas would pick up this record. Previously, the ID R picked up the overall record at the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb, and it also earned the EV record at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, a crown it intends to fight for again this year when the hillclimb kicks off on July 4.The ID R is a beast of a race car. Built as part of an effort to expand awareness of VW’s fledgling ID electric sub-brand, this record breaker has two electric motors putting out 670 horsepower and 479 pound-feet of torque. It weighs less than 2,425 pounds, as well, which results in the bonkers acceleration seen in the video. And, judging by how well it’s doing at various tracks and events, it’s unlikely that this will be the last we see of it. Now playing: Watch this: More about 2022 Volkswagen I.D. Buzz VW’s adorable I.D. Buzz charms us on the California coast 18 Photos 1 Share your voice 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Enlarge ImageRomain Dumas was a natural choice for the run, having loads of experience with both the ID R and the ‘Ring itself. Volkswagen A little over a week ago, Volkswagen’s record-breaking ID R electric race car captured the EV lap record at the Nürburgring Nordschleife with an astounding lap of 6 minutes, 5 seconds. If you haven’t watched the in-car footage yet, here’s your chance.Volkswagen, not one to miss an opportunity, has posted its onboard footage from the ID R’s record-setting run on June 3. It’s absolutely wild, with its two electric motors screaming in high pitches while the tires do everything they can to maintain grip. It’s incredible just how quickly the trees and barriers fly past the ID R. It’s like the video is permanently set to fast-forward. Benny Hill would be proud. Tags Comment More From Roadshow Electric Cars Car Culture 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything betterlast_img read more

Pakistan polling station blast kills at least 28

first_imgMap of Pakistan locating deadly blast on election day — AFPAt least 28 people were killed and 35 wounded in a suicide attack on a polling station in the southwestern Pakistani city of Quetta, officials said, as millions voted in a nationwide election Wednesday.”(The bomber) was trying to enter the polling station. When police tried to stop him he blew himself up,” a local administration official in Quetta, Hashim Ghilzai, told AFP. The incident and toll were confirmed by a second senior local official.The attack was not immediately claimed by any group.Balochistan, Pakistan’s poorest and most restive province, suffers from Islamist and separatist insurgencies.It was hit by several bombings during the brief but acrimonious election campaign — including a devastating blast claimed by the Islamic State group which killed 153 people this month, and was Pakistan’s deadliest ever suicide attack.An earlier attack in the province on Wednesday left one policeman dead and three wounded when a hand grenade was thrown at a polling station in the village of Koshk, in Khuzdar district.The military has stationed over 370,000 personnel across Pakistan to ensure security for the election, bolstered by an additional 450,000 police.last_img read more

Study suggests common pesticide clothianidin causes immunity problems in bees

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Headlines over the past couple of years have made it very clear that something is causing honeybees to die in unexplained ways. Whole colonies suddenly die, with no clear explanation. Now known as Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), the problem has reached the point of panic as honeybees are the chief means for pollination of crops around the world. At this point, scientists suspect that the disorder involves something that is causing the immune system in the bees to break down, leaving them unable to fight off bacteria and viruses. In this new effort, the research team contends that they’ve found one of the missing links—a single pesticide that causes bees exposed to it, to develop immunity problems.In their lab, the researchers started by isolating a family of proteins (called LRR) that are similar to other proteins found in other animals that are known to regulate immune response—specifically, its presence, they found, causes another protein (NF-κB) directly involved in immune response, to be inhibited. Next, they exposed honeybees to the pesticide clothianidin and subsequently measured gene expression and protein levels in them. They found an increase in the expression of the gene responsible for LRR levels and lowered levels of NF-κB, which the researchers claim, suggests a direct link between exposure to the toxin and a damaged immune system. The researchers ran the same tests on bees exposed to another pesticide— chlorpyriphos—and found no ill effects, which they suggest means CCD might be caused by one or a just a few pesticides. Next, the researchers exposed the bees that had been exposed to clothianidin to a pathogen called the deformed wing virus. Normally, healthy bees show resistance to the virus and are not impacted by it. After exposure to clothianidin, however, the researchers found the virus was able to reproduce in the bees, suggesting the bee’s immune response had been compromised. (Phys.org) —A team of researchers with members from several universities in Italy has found that exposure to the common pesticide clothianidin can cause immunity problems in honeybees, leading to an increased risk of dying from common viral infections. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers found that exposure to clothianidin resulted in an increase in a family of proteins that inhibit the development of other proteins that are involved in the immune process. More information: Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees, PNAS, Published online before print October 21, 2013, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1314923110AbstractLarge-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture. Explore further Researchers find high-fructose corn syrup may be tied to worldwide collapse of bee colonies © 2013 Phys.org Citation: Study suggests common pesticide clothianidin causes immunity problems in bees (2013, October 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-common-pesticide-clothianidin-immunity-problems.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Teach toddlers emotions to help them behave better

first_imgHelping your toddler understand and express emotions may reduce behavioural problems later on, says a new study.“Our findings offer promise for a practical, cost-effective parenting strategy to support at-risk toddlers’ social and emotional development and reduce behavioural problems,” said lead investigator of the study Holly Brophy-Herb, professor at Michigan State University in the US.The research, part of a larger study funded by a grant from the US Department of Health and Human Services, involved 89 toddlers (ages 18 months to about two years) from low-income families.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Mothers were asked to look at a wordless picture book with their toddlers. The book included many emotional undertones as illustrations depicted a girl who lost and found a pet.Brophy-Herb and her fellow researchers focused on mothers’ “emotion bridging” with the child. That involves mothers not only labelling the emotion (for example, sad) but also putting it into context and tying it back to the child’s life.During a follow-up visit with the families, about seven months later, the researchers found fewer behavioural problems in the higher-risk children. This might be because emotion bridging acts as a tool through which toddlers can begin to learn about their emotions and gradually learn simple words to express emotions, needs and wishes, instead of acting out physically, Brophy-Herb said.The findings appeared in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioural Pediatrics.last_img read more