TRAFFIC ADVISORY Town Announces Road Paving Projects For Shawsheen Ave Carter Lane

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington Department of Public Works will be grinding and resurfacing the following roadways, potentially starting Wednesday, July 11, 2018:Shawsheen Avenue (Aldrich Road to Foot Bridge of Old Shawsheen Avenue)Carter Lane (Shawsheen Avenue to 23 Carter Lane)Sherburn Place (Shawsheen Avenue to End)During grinding and paving operations, the roadways will be closed to cut-through traffic.  Area residents will have access to and from their properties, although there may be short delays.  Please obey the directives of police details, detour signs, and warning signs during all construction operations.This date may be postponed due to inclement weather or scheduling delays with the Town’s roadway contractor.If you have any questions, or require additional information, please contact the Department of Public Works at 978-658-4481.(NOTE: The above announcement is from the Wilmington DPW.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedTRAFFIC ADVISORY: Wilmington DPW Announces Paving Projects In Arlene Ave. & Burt Rd. Neighborhoods On Aug. 12-13In “Government”TRAFFIC ADVISORY: Wilmington DPW Announces Upcoming Paving Projects For 8 StreetsIn “Government”TRAFFIC ADVISORY: Shawsheen Ave. Area Paving To Begin August 15In “Government”last_img read more

Egypt mosque attack kills at least 235 State media

first_imgEgyptians gather around bodies following a gun and bombing attack at the Rawda mosque, roughly 40 kilometres west of the North Sinai capital of El-Arish, on 24 November 2017. A bomb explosion ripped through the mosque before gunmen opened fire on the worshippers gathered for weekly Friday prayers, officials said. Photo: AFPArmed attackers on Friday killed at least 235 worshippers in a bomb and gun assault on a packed mosque in Egypt’s restive North Sinai province, state media reported, the country’s deadliest attack in recent memory.A bomb explosion ripped through the Rawda mosque frequented by Sufis roughly 40 kilometres west of the North Sinai capital of El-Arish before gunmen opened fire on those gathered for weekly Friday prayers, officials said.Witnesses said the assailants had surrounded the mosque with all-terrain vehicles then planted a bomb outside.The gunmen then mowed down the panicked worshippers as they attempted to flee and used the congregants’ vehicles they had set alight to block routes to the mosque.State television reported at least 235 people were killed and 109 wounded in the attack, the scale of which is unprecedented in a four-year insurgency by Islamist extremist groups.Egyptians gather around bodies following a gun and bombing attack at the Rawda mosque, roughly 40 kilometres west of the North Sinai capital of El-Arish, on 24 November, 2017. Photo: AFPEgypt’s presidency declared three days of mourning, state television reported, as President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi met his security ministers to follow developments.UK foreign minister Boris Johnson condemned the “barbaric attack” in a post on Twitter, while his French counterpart Jean-Yves Le Drian expressed his condolences to the families of victims of the “despicable attack”.Ahmed Abul Gheit, head of the Arab League, which is based in Cairo, condemned the “terrifying crime which again shows that Islam is innocent of those who follow extremist terrorist ideology,” his spokesman said in a statement.- IS targeting of Sufis -There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack.The Islamic State group’s Egypt branch has killed hundreds of policemen and soldiers, and also civilians accused of working with the authorities, in attacks in the north of the Sinai peninsula.They have also targeted followers of the mystical Sufi branch of Sunni Islam as well as Christians.The victims of Friday’s attack included civilians and conscripts praying at the mosque.A tribal leader and head of a Bedouin militia that fights IS told AFP that the mosque is known as a place of gathering for Sufis.Map of Egypt locating El-Arish in the northern Sinai region, where dozens of people were killed in an attack by gunmen on Friday, 24 November. / AFPThe Islamic State group shares the puritan Salafi view of Sufis as heretics for seeking the intercession of saints.The jihadists had previously kidnapped and beheaded an elderly Sufi leader, accusing him of practising magic which Islam forbids, and abducted Sufi practitioners later released after “repenting.”An IS propaganda outlet had published an interview earlier with the commander of its “morality police” in Sinai who said their “first priority was to combat the manifestations of polytheism including Sufism.”The group has killed more than 100 Christians in church bombings and shootings in Sinai and other parts of Egypt, forcing many to flee the peninsula.The military has struggled to quell jihadists who pledged allegiance to IS in November 2014.IS regularly conducts attacks against soldiers and policemen in the peninsula bordering Israel and the Palestinian Gaza Strip, although the frequency and scale of such attacks has diminished over the past year.The jihadists have since increasingly turned to civilian targets, attacking not only Christians and Sufis but also Bedouin Sinai inhabitants accused of working with the army.Aside from IS, Egypt also faces a threat from Al-Qaeda-aligned jihadists who operate out of neighbouring Libya.A group calling itself Ansar al-Islam — Supporters of Islam in Arabic — claimed an October ambush in Egypt’s Western Desert that killed at least 16 policemen.Many of those killed belonged to the interior ministry’s secretive National Security Service.The military later conducted air strikes on the attackers, killing their leader Emad al-Din Abdel Hamid, a most wanted jihadist who was a military officer before joining an Al-Qaeda-affiliated group in Libya’s militant stronghold of Derna.last_img read more

Afghanistan accuses Pakistan of air strikes

first_imgAn Afghan child receives treatment at a hospital after Monday`s airstrike in Kunduz province, Afghanistan 3 April, 2018. Photo: ReutersAfghanistan on Thursday accused Pakistan of air strikes causing “huge financial damages” in its province of Kunar bordering Pakistan, highlighting long-standing mistrust between the neighbours, even as both seek ways to improve security.The incident came ahead of a visit to Kabul on Friday by Pakistani Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi for talks with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani on cooperation to halt militant attacks.Pakistani jets dropped four bombs on Wednesday evening in Kunar’s Dangam district, Afghanistan’s ministry of foreign affairs said in a statement, without elaborating on the damage or making any mention of casualties.”Afghanistan warns that continuing violations of international norms … will have further consequences on the relations between the two countries,” the ministry added.Pakistan rejected as “baseless” the allegation that it violated Afghan airspace, however.In a statement, its foreign affairs ministry said Pakistan’s security forces were countering militant groups based in Afghanistan that launch attacks across the border.Military officials of the two countries met on Thursday in the Pakistani city of Rawalpindi, where Pakistan shared details of the operations with Afghanistan, it added. The operations took place on the Pakistani side of the border, Pakistan said.Afghanistan should focus on plugging gaps on its side of the border and refrain from the “blame game”, the ministry said.Afghanistan’s Western-backed government has long accused Pakistan of harbouring Afghan Taliban insurgents, a charge that Islamabad denies.Islamabad, in turn, accuses Afghanistan of not doing enough to eradicate Pakistani Taliban militants, many of whom are based in Afghanistan and mostly carry out attacks inside Pakistan.last_img

Report DC Circulator Streetcar Deepen Racial Bias

first_imgAn Amalgamated Transit Union report released May 17 excoriates the District for using contractors to create the D.C. Circulator and the D.C. Streetcar, two premium transit services the report says deepen racial bias in the city.The Fool D.C. Twice: Why D.C. Must Abandon Private Sector Control of Public Transit}report alleges both systems cater to wealthy Whites and tourists, while relying on taxpayers – who don’t use the services – to subsidize them when rider expectations fall short.The ATU released a report that claims private sector control of the D.C. transit system is benefiting wealthy Whites. (Courtesy Photo)“These services tend to exacerbate existing patterns of inequality,” Michael McCall-Delgado, the union’s strategic researcher, said on a conference call with reporters. He added that the streetcar was specifically designed to hasten gentrification along the H Street corridor in the city’s Northeast quadrant.The report primarily focuses on labor issues, safety standard violations, and failures to meet stated ridership and service goals – matters the union says besieged both systems after the city contracted them to for-profit companies.The union has been against the privatization of bus routes, the Circulator and the Streetcar for some time. In 2013, the union was against privatization of the systems. The union’s initial complaint against privatization was job loss, rider dissatisfaction and loss of public input.The transit union supports mass transit and represents more than 190,000 transit and allied workers in the U.S. and Canada.It’s up to residents to demand that public officials implement a transportation system that serves the community, instead of one that “only subsidizes the leisure of city elites,” the report said. District riders should also tell city officials to stop attempting to save money by contracting services out to for-profit companies. The private sector becomes a barrier between city officials and riders that officials “hide behind” when things go awry, Delgado said.“Each one gets to use the other as a shield for what the other is supposed to be doing,” Delgado said.Essie Jackson lives in Anacostia and has cleaned offices at the U.S. Department of Housing for 14 years. She relies on the A8 bus to get her from her home to the Anacostia Metro station and then on the Green Line to take her to work. Jackson, 61, then takes the reverse route to get home.Officials from the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority should set the schedules so that the buses are waiting for riders as soon as they get off the train, she said. “They shouldn’t have to wait an hour and a half,” Jackson said.When the bus does come, it’s jam-packed with people, she said, forcing her to stand. She said she is already battling several injuries, is blind in her left eye, and is afraid of hurting herself if she falls on the bus.Ty Johnson, also a resident of Anacostia, wishes WMATA ran trains more frequently on the Green Line. She added that the ongoing Safe Track program on the Red Line frequently makes her late for her retail job in Friendship Heights. “It’s ridiculous how long the surges are,” Johnson, 27, said.Labor groups’ fight against privatization efforts within transit continued this week. On May 22, Metro Washington Council AFL-CIO held a news conference urging labor leaders to reject privatization and to endorse ATU Local 689’s proposal to stabilize and improve WMATA.Certain parts of the Fool D.C. Twice calls out the Circulator for serving an average census tract that is 15 percent Whiter and 18 percent less Black than the District’s population. The Circulator runs six routes that go through Georgetown, Navy Yard, DuPont Circle, the National Mall, Adams Morgan, Woodley Park, and others. It only costs $1 to ride. “The decision to run the Circulator in areas with a wealthier, Whiter population created a politically influential constituency for the service,” the report said. “This in turn has created pressure on local politicians to defend the service and expand it, even into neighborhoods that are already covered by the existing Metrobus network.”Meanwhile, three Metrobus lines already serve the rapidly gentrifying H Street corridor and transport more than 17,400 riders every weekday, according to the report. Those routes link commuters to job centers and serve residents living east of the Anacostia River in Wards 7 and 8, the report said.“These routes already provide broader service than the streetcar does with the added flexibility of being able to maneuver around obstructions,” the report said.According to the Washington Post article in July 2013, a privatization deal was supposed to include building a streetcar system in Anacostia and along H Street. To date, McDonald Transit Associates, the contractor behind D.C. Streetcar, has only completed the H Street streetcar system.First Transit, the contractor that operates D.C. Circulator, and McDonald Transit Associates did not respond to the AFRO’s requests for comment.Ron Holzer, a WMATA spokesman, cautions against condemning all contracts.To maximize efficiency while maintaining or enhancing service, General Manager Paul Wiedefeld’s has called for additional public sector support for Metro where it makes sense.  “With regard to Circulator, DDOT (District Department of Transportation) and WMATA are working cooperatively to improve the performance of this particular contract,” Holzer told the AFRO via email.Terry Owens, a DDOT spokesman told the AFRO via email that the agency continuously evaluates its transit services to determine where improvements can be made. He declined to comment further, saying he had not read the ATU report.Yet for all of WMATA’s problems, Jackson, who doesn’t drive, says she’s grateful for the system.“I thank God for Metro, because it takes me to where I need to go.”last_img read more