PreConference Workshop to Explore Origins of BRAC Likely Focus of Next Round

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR Congress so far has successfully ignored the Obama administration’s requests to hold a new BRAC round, but as Pentagon budget cuts mount, pressure continues to build for lawmakers to approve additional base closures. While the exact timing of a new round remains uncertain, most Washington experts consider a BRAC round inevitable.Next month’s National Summit will feature a pre-conference workshop covering the mechanics of the BRAC process along with insight about past rounds from the executive director of the most recent BRAC commission and DOD’s former installations chief.The session will be moderated by George Schlossberg, ADC’s long-time general counsel, a partner at Kutak Rock LLP and BRAC expert. For community members that are new to BRAC — or those that want a refresher — Schlossberg will discuss how the federal government came up with the idea of relying on an independent commission to close military installations and how Congress settled on the BRAC process used most recently in 2005.The panel will walk attendees through the initial steps in a BRAC round — the preparation of a force structure plan, inventory of installations and evaluation criteria. Next, it will delve into the process followed by the Pentagon to develop its list of recommended closures and realignments, including the data calls sent to each installation, and the use of the COBRA model to calculate the costs and benefits of individual closures. The panel also will discuss how the BRAC commission operates, including the scheduling of public hearings, and the voting process for revising the department’s closure recommendations and approving final recommendations.Schlossberg will be joined at the workshop by Charles Battaglia, who served as executive director of the 2005 BRAC Commission, and Dorothy Robyn, who served as deputy undersecretary of defense for installations and environment in the first half of the Obama administration. Battaglia and Robyn will help provide workshop attendees with an insider’s view of the BRAC process from the perspective of DOD and the BRAC commission.In a conversation with View from the Summit, Schlossberg acknowledged the next base closure round likely could include some changes in its mechanics, but emphasized that its core elements — primarily, its reliance on an independent, bipartisan commission to review DOD’s recommendations in a public forum with community input — almost certainly would remain in place.For those looking for a comprehensive introduction to the BRAC process, don’t miss the Summit’s BRAC 101 pre-conference workshop! A great introduction to the workshop is the Journal of Defense Communities article about the legislative history of BRAC.last_img read more

SelfDriving Car Industry Eyes Devens for Test Site

first_imgA number of companies developing technology for autonomous vehicle are considering leasing space at Devens, the base reuse project located 35 miles west of downtown Boston, to take advantage of the property’s vacant neighborhoods for testing cars.“They’re looking for places they can test this technology,” said Thatcher Kezer, senior vice president at MassDevelopment, the agency that manages Devens.Industry has expressed a “high level of interest” in Devens, and the agency now is trying to determine the companies’ specific needs, Kezer told MassLive.com.Beyond generating additional revenue for MassDevelopment, the agency believes establishing Devens as a testing site for autonomous cars would help create a cluster of companies working on autonomous vehicles.“There’s a higher level of purpose here than just generating revenue off the land we own,” he said. “It fits with the larger economic development mission of the commonwealth.”With a demand for roads simulating real-life conditions, Devens is an ideal test site, according to Kezer.“Their need is space that’s open and clear of other objects so they can have a clean visual around the vehicle so they can do testing, and then they need areas that are very similar to real-world neighborhoods,” he said. “We have available space that meets those needs.”The former Concord Naval Weapons Station in northern California already has established a research and testing hub for self-driving cars and connected vehicles. Several automakers, including Honda and Mercedes-Benz, have reached agreements with the Contra Costa Transportation Authority to use the base’s GoMentum Station. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Wilmington School Lunch Menus Week of September 16 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are the Wilmington Public Schools lunch menus for the week of September 16, 2018.Wilmington High School & Wilmington Middle SchoolMonday, September 17Steak & Cheese on a Wholegrain Roll; Seasoned Wedges; Fresh AppleTuesday, September 18Ultimate Nachos with Seasoned Meat, Cheese Sauce, Lettuce & Tomato, Black Bean Salsa, Salsa, Brown Rice; PineapplesWednesday, September 19Low-Sodium Low-Fat Mozzarella Sticks; Marinara Sauce; Green Beans; Wholegrain Breadstick; AppleslicesThursday, September 20Rotisserie Chicken or BBQ Chicken; Wholewheat Roll; Whipped Potatoes; Farm Fresh Corn On The CobFriday, September 21Wholegrain Individual Pizza Topped With Buffalo Chicken or BBQ Chicken; Tossed Salad; OrangesLunch ($2.65-$2.85) includes: Entree (main or alternative); Vegetable, Fruit or Juice and 8 oz. Assorted Lowfat Milk or Skim MilkAlternate Daily Lunch Choices at High School: Salad Bar, Pizza, Soup & Choice of SandwichAlternate Daily Lunch Choices at Middle School: Pre-made SaladAlso Available Daily: Variety of Fresh Fruit, Side Caesar salad or Baby Carrots, WG Bagel with Cheese StickMenus Subject To Occasional ChangeParticipates in The Farm-To-School ProgramWest Intermediate, North Intermediate, Shawsheen Elementary, Woburn Street ElementaryMonday, September 17Wholegrain Mini Pancakes; Syrup; Sausage Links; Hashbrown; 100% JuiceTuesday, September 18Ultimate Nachos with Seasoned Meat, Cheese Sauce, Lettuce & Tomato, Black Bean Salsa, Salsa, Brown Rice; PineapplesWednesday, September 19Low-Sodium Low-Fat Mozzarella Sticks; Marinara Sauce; Green Beans; Wholegrain Breadstick; AppleslicesThursday, September 20Chicken Nuggets; Wholewheat Roll; Whipped Potatoes; Farm Fresh Corn On The CobFriday, September 21Wholegrain Pizza Slice; Tossed Salad; OrangesLunch ($2.40) includes: Entree (Main or alternative); Vegetable, Fruit or Justice and MilkAlternate Daily Lunch Choices: Ham & Cheese, Turkey & Cheese, Tuna, Salad Bar (Woburn St. only), Premade Salads (North, West & Shawsheen only), Pizza (Mon & Wed only), Bagels (Tues & Thurs only)Also Available Daily: Assorted Lowfat Milk or Skim Milk; Assorted Fresh Fruit; Assorted Juice; DessertMenus Subject To Occasional ChangeParticipates in The Farm-To-School ProgramBoutwell Early Childhood Center & Wildwood Early Childhood CenterMonday, September 17Wholegrain Mini Pancakes; Syrup; Sausage Links; Hashbrown; 100% JuiceTuesday, September 18Ultimate Nachos with Seasoned Meat, Cheese Sauce, Lettuce & Tomato, Black Bean Salsa, Salsa, Brown Rice; PineapplesWednesday, September 19Low-Sodium Low-Fat Mozzarella Sticks; Marinara Sauce; Green Beans; Wholegrain Breadstick; AppleslicesThursday, September 20Chicken Nuggets; Wholewheat Roll; Whipped Potatoes; Farm Fresh Corn On The CobFriday, September 21Wholegrain Pizza Slice; Tossed Salad; OrangesLunch ($2.40) includes: Entree (main or alternative); Vegetable, Fruit or Juice and assorted lowfat or skim milkAlternate Daily Lunch Choices: WG Pizza (Mon. & Wed. only); Whole Wheat Bagel & Cheese Stick (Tues. & Thurs. only); Turkey & Cheese sandwich on WG bread (Mon., Wed., Fri. only); Ham & Cheese sandwich on WG bread (Tues. & Thurs. only)Also Available Daily: Assorted snacks and baked goods ($0.50-$0.60)Menus Subject To Occasional ChangeParticipates in The Farm-To-School Program(NOTE: View these menus, plus the Gluten Free menus, online HERE.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington School Lunch Menus (Week of September 9, 2019)In “Education”Wilmington School Lunch Menus (Week of September 2, 2019)In “Education”Wilmington School Lunch Menus (Week of June 2, 2019)In “Education”last_img read more

Study Electric Market Reforms Delivered What Was Intended

first_img 00:00 /01:18 Listen Photo by Fré Sonneveld. CC0 license. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:center_img X “Deregulating” the Texas electricity market “delivered what was intended.”That’s the takeaway from a new study of the price you pay for electricity, but the findings don’t mean there’s a consensus on whether competition is good for consumers.Here’s the big question: do you get a better deal if you can choose who you buy electricity from, or is better if you have no choice, and have to buy from one city-owned utility company?New research from Rice University shows that since reforms aimed at expanding consumer choice went into effect 15 years ago, they have made progress toward lowering prices. “As we rolled through 2016, you actually saw that rates in competitive areas had moved to a point of parity with rates in non-competitive areas,” says Ken Medlock, one of the study’s authors. Still, the consumer advocacy group Texas Coalition for Affordable Power has repeatedly documented more expensive electricity in places like Houston, where there are a lot of options. “The findings here are a bit rosier than our findings over the years,” says R.A. Dyer, a policy analyst with the group.Medlock, with Rice University, says it’s true that competitive markets have been more expensive on average since deregulation, but he says that’s because reforms took a while to have an impact.“Prices were adjusting over time to reflect the introduction of competition in the area where you lived, whereas maybe it wasn’t introduced in an area where your friend lived,” he says. Medlock says cheap natural gas prices have helped lower electric costs in areas with multiple providers, but natural gas hasn’t had much of an impact in places with one city-owned provider. Sharelast_img read more