STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Ferreira Knibbs Named To Deans List At Quinnipiac

first_imgHAMDEN, CT — Wilmington students Victoria Ferreira and Madison Knibbs have been named to the Dean’s List at Quinnipiac University for the Spring of 2019.To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a grade point average of at least 3.5 with no grade lower than C. Full-time students must complete at least 14 credits in a semester, with at least 12 credits that have been graded on a letter grade basis to be eligible. Part-time students must complete at least six credits during a semester.About Quinnipiac UniversityQuinnipiac is a private, coeducational, nonsectarian institution located 90 minutes north of New York City and two hours from Boston. The university enrolls 6,400 full-time undergraduate and 2,300 graduate students in 58 undergraduate and more than 20 graduate programs of study in its School of Business and Engineering, School of Communications, School of Education, School of Health Sciences, School of Law, Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine, School of Nursing and College of Arts and Sciences. Quinnipiac consistently ranks among the top regional universities in the North in U.S. News & World Report’s America’s Best Colleges issue. For more information, please visit http://www.quinnipiac.edu.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Quinnipiac.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Ferreira & Knibbs Named To Dean’s List At Quinnipiac UniversityIn “Education”Wilmington’s Victoria Ferreira Named To Dean’s List At Quinnipiac UniversityIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Madison Knibbs Named To Dean’s List At Quinnipiac UniversityIn “Education”last_img read more

Fireballs dazzle two continents in a single night

first_imgA fireball lighting up the east coast of the US. AMS; video screenshot by Eric Mack/CNET Late Tuesday into early Wednesday was a big night for combustible cosmic collisions, as multiple meteors flamed out over some of the biggest cities in the United States and Europe.  We might have the Lyrid meteor shower to thank for this show. The northern hemisphere’s annual spring shooting star bonanza officially became active Tuesday night and is known for producing fireballs.  One fireball was spotted in skies from Berlin to Amsterdam to Copenhagen just before midnight local time. Later, as midnight approached on the east coast of the US, another meteor was seen burning up as it crashed into our atmosphere. That fireball was spotted at 10:57 p.m. EDT and could be viewed all the way from New England to the Carolinas. The American Meteor Society received dozens of reports of the European fireball, which is estimated to have flamed out high over Germany, and hundreds of reports of the eastern US meteor that was over Delaware at its brightest moment of disintegration. Fireballs are actually a very common occurrence that might happen thousands of times every day, but the vast majority aren’t very bright, or they’re masked by daylight or happen over the ocean and other unpopulated areas and go unseen by human eyes. For two exceptionally bright fireballs to burn up over major population centers in the same night is more rare. Most fireballs are actually much higher in the sky than they might appear, generally well above 30 miles, which is why the same fireball was seen from a dozen different US states Tuesday evening.  There could be more to come this week. The Lyrid meteor shower is currently building toward its peak, Sunday night, when 10 to 20 shooting stars per hour may be visible, though some may be washed out by a nearly full moon.  Sometimes there can be an outburst of hyperactive meteor activity producing hundreds of visible trails per hour during a shower like the Lyrids. Though no outburst is predicted for this year, there’s always a chance, and this early fireball activity is reason to be optimistic.  Post a comment Sci-Tech Tags 14 Photoscenter_img 2018 Perseid meteor shower sizzles across the sky 0 Space Share your voicelast_img read more

Toyota and CATL are partnering up on battery production

first_img Now playing: Watch this: Post a comment 29 Photos Car Industry Auto Tech 2020 Lincoln Aviator plug-in hybrid first drive: This changes everything Tags More From Roadshow Toyota Enlarge ImageSoon the batteries for Toyota’s many hybrids, PHEVs and hydrogen cars could be coming from Chinese supplier CATL. Nick Miotke/Roadshow If you’re a major automotive manufacturer, it’s pretty much mandatory that you be working on some kind of electric vehicle development right now, especially if you do a lot of business in China.That’s certainly the position in which Toyota finds itself, so it’s had to go out, beat the bushes and find itself a sizable Chinese EV battery provider — which it did in the form of CATL, according to an announcement made by Toyota on Wednesday.If CATL sounds familiar, it’s because it’s also working with Volvo to provide batteries for that brand and its Polestar subsidiary. CATL is also working with Honda and was in talks with Tesla for a while to provide cells for Gigafactory Shanghai, though that ended up not working out.”To further promote the widespread use of electrified vehicles, CATL and Toyota agree that a stable supply of batteries is critical and that battery technology must be further developed and advanced,” Toyota representatives said in a statement.Stable is the key word there. Batteries are a volatile business, especially considering the vast amounts of relatively rare and expensive minerals they require. Thankfully for companies like CATL, many of those minerals are being mined inside China’s borders, but other firms elsewhere in the world haven’t been so fortunate.This news of Toyota’s battery partnership comes hot on the heels of its announcement that it plans to offer an electrified version of every single Lexus model by 2025 as well as receiving half of its revenue from the sale of electrified vehicles by 2025. Share your voice 2020 Ford Explorer Hybrid first drive: A new kind of Explorer 0 9:29 2019 Land Rover Range Rover P400e review: A hard hybrid to recommend The 2020 Toyota Corolla Hybrid requires few sacrifices to save gas On the road: Toyota Mirai Toyota Volvolast_img read more

Harbhajan Singhs tweet on Pakistani flag generates rage on social media

first_imgIts a clever punch line, where is the offence in it? No need to paint religion and start a border war on twitter. ( also why is every paki response “get toilets first”? Is that the only thing you have more of than India?)— Kasturi Shankar (@KasthuriShankar) July 22, 2019The tweet has created controversy on social media platforms as many people are taking it as fun while others have condemned it. On the other hand, Indian skipper Virat Kohli, Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag and Cheteshwar Pujara were among the many who congratulated ISRO for successfully carrying out the launch of Chandrayan 2.  Virat Kohli stated that it is another proud moment for the nation. Another historic and proud moment for the nation as the #Chandrayaan 2 is launched Jai Hind #ISRO #IndiaMoonMission — Virat Kohli (@imVkohli) July 22, 2019Cricketing legend Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, Cheteshwar Pujara congratulated team ISRO and wished them for successful missions in the future.I congratulate Team @isro on achieving yet another milestone with the launch of #Chandrayaan2!Hope this paves the way for many more ambitious and successful missions in the future. Jai Hind ! pic.twitter.com/io919I1YrS— Sachin Tendulkar (@sachin_rt) July 22, 2019 Harbhajan Singh was a key member of India’s 2011 World Cup-winning squad. Matthew Lewis/Getty ImagesFormer Indian cricketer and off-spinner Harbhajan Singh took to Twitter to troll Pakistan and some other countries who have the moon on their national flags after India’s second lunar mission Chandrayaan-2 took off successfully from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) in Sriharikota on Monday, July 22.In the tweet, Harbhajan stated that some countries have the moon on their flags while some have their flags on the moon. The tweet also had the images of national flags with moon on it with Pakistani flag’s picture being the first. Some countries have moon on their flagsWhile some countries having their flags on moon #Chandrayaan2theMoon— Harbhajan Turbanator (@harbhajan_singh) July 22, 2019The first line of the tweet had images of flags of countries including Pakistan, Algeria, Turkey, Maldives, Mauritania, Tunisia, Libya, Malaysia and Azerbaijan. The second line had flags of the countries who have conducted the moon missions successfully including US, India, China and Russia.Shame on you @harbhajan_singh . Your Tweet is in bad taste and shows Indians in a bad light. You are not a True Sportsman. You are a Communal Person I hope @bcci takes action against You for your Communal Tweet and stops yours Pension . Shame on You. — Ashish Joshi (@acjoshi) July 22, 2019 Many congratulations to Team #Chandrayaan2 @isro for the successful and seamless launch ! pic.twitter.com/LINKS5ZHUk — Virender Sehwag (@virendersehwag) July 22, 2019center_img Congratulations team @ISRO, this is a very proud and historical moment for India! #Chandrayaan2— cheteshwar pujara (@cheteshwar1) July 22, 2019last_img read more

Should You Lease or Buy Your Tech Equipment

first_imgOpinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Ultimately, a few simple rules of thumb may help you decide to lease or buy. If your equipment requirements are relatively small and you have the money–or can get a low-interest loan–then just buy it. You’ll save money in the long run. However, if you require a substantial amount of equipment, such as computers for your new company’s 10 employees, leasing may be a better option. After all, why tie up a large amount of cash–especially when you could use that money to establish or grow your business? Leasing keeps your equipment up-to-date. Computers and other tech equipment eventually become obsolete. With a lease, you pass the financial burden of obsolescence to the equipment leasing company. For example, let’s say you have a two-year lease on a copy machine. After that lease expires, you’re free to lease whatever equipment is newer, faster and cheaper. (This is also a reason some people prefer to lease their cars.) In fact, 65 percent of respondents to a 2005 Equipment Leasing Association survey said the ability to have the latest equipment was leasing’s number-one perceived benefit. You’ll have predictable monthly expenses. With a lease, you have a pre-determined monthly line item, which can help you budget more effectively. Thirty-five percent of respondents to the Equipment Leasing Association’s survey said this was leasing’s second-highest benefit. You pay nothing up front. Many small businesses struggle with cash flow and must keep their coffers as full as possible. Because leases rarely require a down payment, you can acquire new equipment without tapping much-needed funds. You’re able to more easily keep up with your competitors. Leasing can enable your small business to acquire sophisticated technology, such as a voice over internet protocol (VoIP) phone system, that might be otherwise unaffordable. The result: You’re better able to keep up with your larger competitors without draining your financial resources. Register Now » Asking the Right QuestionsIf you’re thinking about leasing equipment, you’ll need to do your homework to ensure you get the most favorable terms. Here are a few questions that’ll help you get started: Buying: The Benefits Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals It’s easier than leasing. Buying equipment is easy–you decide what you need, then go out and buy it. Taking out a lease, however, involves at least some paperwork, as leasing companies often ask for detailed, updated financial information. They may also ask how and where the leased equipment will be used. Also, lease terms can be complicated to negotiate. And if you don’t negotiate properly, you could end up paying more than you should or receiving unfavorable terms. You call the shots regarding maintenance. Equipment leases often require you to maintain equipment according to the leasing company’s specifications, and that can get expensive. When you buy the equipment outright, you determine the maintenance schedule yourself. Your equipment is deductible. Section 179 of the IRS code lets you deduct the full cost of newly purchased assets, such as computer equipment, in the first year. With most leases favored by small businesses–called operating leases–you can only deduct the monthly payment. Leasing: The Downsides Buying: The Downsides Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. The next time your business needs new computers, networking equipment or other technology, should you buy it or lease it? If you don’t know, read on. This month we’ll take a look at the benefits–and downsides–of both leasing and buying technology equipment, plus the questions you should ask to ensure you get the best deal.Leasing: The Benefits The initial outlay for needed equipment may be too much. Your business may have to tie up lines of credit or cough up a hefty sum to acquire the equipment it needs. Those lines of credit and funds could be used elsewhere for marketing, advertising or other functions that can help grow your business. Eventually, you’re stuck with outdated equipment. As I mentioned earlier, computer technology becomes outdated quickly. A growing small business may need to refresh its technology in some areas every 18 months. That means you’re eventually stuck with outdated equipment that you must donate, sell or recycle. You’ll pay more in the long run. Ultimately, leasing is almost always more expensive than purchasing. For example, a $4,000 computer would cost a total of $5,760 if leased for three years at $160 per month but only $4,000 (plus sales tax) if purchased outright. You’re obligated to keep paying even if you stop using the equipment. Depending on the lease terms, you may have to make payments for the entire lease period, even if you no longer need the equipment, which can happen if your business changes. What type of lease are you being asked to sign–a capital lease or an operating lease? A capital lease is similar to a loan. With this type of lease, the equipment is considered an asset on your balance sheet, and you get the benefits–such as tax depreciation–and risks–including obsolescence–of ownership. Capital leases are often for as long as five years. With an operating lease , the leasing company retains ownership, and for tax purposes, the equipment is considered a monthly operating expense rather than a depreciable asset. Operating leases are generally more popular among small businesses because they don’t tie up funds and are usually short-term–three years or less. Is there a buyout option? You may have a choice between a fair-market value (FMV) option and a $1 buyout option. FMV means you can buy the equipment at the lease’s end for its fair-market value, which could be hundreds of dollars. In contrast, a $1 buyout option means the equipment is yours for $1 when the lease expires. And while that sounds like the best option, keep in mind that monthly payments on FMV leases are usually lower than $1 buyout leases. If you’re fairly certain you’ll want to upgrade to new technology when your lease expires, go with the FMV option. How long is the lease for? Usually, leases for computer equipment run 24, 36 or 48 months. The longer your lease, the lower your monthly payments–but you’re also likely to pay more over time with a longer lease. Does the equipment have to be insured? Some leasing companies require you to insure the leased equipment. If you don’t, fees may be added to your monthly payment to cover insurance. Can I add to the lease? Most leasing companies don’t mind if you add equipment to an existing lease. Your lease payment will be recalculated accordingly; lease terms don’t usually change. Can I terminate the lease early? What if you no longer need the equipment you’re leasing or you want to upgrade to newer technology sooner than you expected? Find out in advance if you can pay off your lease early, and if there’s a prepayment penalty (and if so, how much?).last_img read more