Former NHL star Tiger Williamss sexualassault trial set for June

first_imgOTTAWA – Former NHL star Dave (Tiger) Williams is set to stand trial next year on sexual assault and assault charges over an alleged incident on a military morale-boosting trip last December.A lawyer for the former Toronto Maple Leaf and Vancouver Canuck, who holds the NHL record for most penalty minutes, says the trial will begin on June 10 and is scheduled to run seven days.Military police arrested and charged the 64-year-old Williams in February after he allegedly assaulted a steward on a military aircraft in December during a tour to meet with Canadian troops in Latvia and Greece.Williams denies the accusations.Military officials are also wrapping up a separate internal review into what happened on the flight that some media reports have said involved heavy drinking and partying.Defence chief Gen. Jonathan Vance ordered the second review after an initial probe by the Air Force soon after the flight, the results of which have not been made public.last_img

Bid to reduce right whale deaths extremely effective Canadian officials say

first_imgHALIFAX – A year after the population of critically endangered North Atlantic right whales suffered devastating losses, Canadian officials say measures taken this season to protect the species have worked.With the summer fishing season in the Gulf of St. Lawrence drawing to a close, the Fisheries Department confirmed Friday that not one whale has died as a result of a ship strike or fishing gear entanglement — the main causes for most of the deaths last season.In all, 17 right whales died last year — 12 of them in Canadian waters — prompting concerns that the population might be on the fast track toward extinction.The federal government responded with a series of protection measures, which included speed restrictions for boats, increased surveillance and a series of closures of fishing areas where right whales were spotted.Some of the measures were unpopular with fishermen, but Fisheries Department spokesman Adam Burns said they were “extremely effective.”“We know that the measures we put in place this year have had real economic impacts on some communities,” he said. “But this is an important step forward for the management measures we put in place.”There are believed to be fewer than 450 North Atlantic right whales remaining and, of those, only about 100 breeding females.In all, 135 individual whales were spotted this summer in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, compared with 114 confirmed sightings last year. However, no calves were seen, a troubling development that has raised new concerns about the fate of these massive mammals.Meanwhile, the protection measures remain in place because some whales were recently spotted in the Gulf, as well as the Roseway Basin off southwestern Nova Scotia and the Grand Manan Basin in the Bay of Fundy.The restrictions won’t be lifted until the whales return to their wintering grounds farther south, Burns said.In June, a fishermen’s group took aim at a fisheries closure in the Bay of Fundy, saying the move was an overreaction because only one whale had been seen in the Grand Manan Basin.That closure and others affected fixed-gear fishermen with licences to fish for lobster, crab, groundfish, herring and mackerel. Snow crab fishermen in the Gulf were also affected.Burns said federal officials have already started getting ready for next season, with a series of consultations with fishing industry representatives planned for this fall in Atlantic Canada and Quebec.And in November, a committee of marine mammal experts will review scientific data that should provide a clearer picture of the whales’ distribution in the region.Fisheries officials are also taking part in pilot projects aimed at testing fishing gear that could reduce the number of entanglements.On Aug. 5, the Campobello Whale Rescue Team managed to free an entangled right whale that had been spotted in the Bay of Fundy a week earlier. The whale, identified as an adult male, had an orange buoy trailing behind it.last_img read more

BC Green Party says member data safe after contract with AggregateIQ

first_imgVANCOUVER – The B.C. Green Party says it does not believe its members’ personal information was stolen, after the party worked with a Victoria-based tech company that’s mired in an international privacy scandal.Executive director Laura Lavin says the Greens contracted AggregateIQ between January and August 2016 to create a new website and voter database.The party has received written confirmation from the company that it destroyed any data in its possession when the contract ended, Lavin said.“Like anybody, we are paying attention to what’s going on in the media. So it was pretty much over the last week or 10 days, when more and more stories started coming out, that we started doing a review of our relationship with AIQ,” Lavin said in an interview.AggregateIQ created a website for the B.C. Greens, but the party ended the contract because the company could not complete the database within the party’s timeframe, said Lavin.The party has reviewed all of its correspondences, as well as the non-disclosure agreement it required the company to sign at the time, she said.It obtained written confirmation that the data was destroyed, after consulting the Office of the B.C. Privacy Commissioner.Lavin said the nature of information the company would have access to varied by member, but may have included names, addresses, email addresses, level of support for the party and particular issues of interest.The Green Party posted a statement on its website explaining the process, emailed each member and will send hard-copies to those who are inaccessible by email, she said.So far, three members have asked that the party delete their profiles from the system.AggregateIQ faces accusations that it played a role in influencing Britain’s vote to leave the European Union.Canadian whistleblower Christopher Wylie has also alleged that the firm used algorithms developed by Cambridge Analytica, a company he says improperly harvested personal data from more than 50-million Facebook users to help Donald Trump win the U.S. presidency.In a statement posted on its website this week, AggregateIQ denies any connection to Cambridge Analytica and says it works in full compliance with the jurisdictions where it operates.last_img read more

CRA lawyers say Loblaw misused Barbadian subsidiary for tax avoidance

first_imgTORONTO – Loblaw Companies Ltd.’s Barbadian banking subsidiary was “playing with its own money” rather than acting as an active business with outside customers and is obligated to pay tax back home, government lawyers told a Toronto court on Wednesday.Barbados-based Glenhuron Bank Ltd. did not meet the requirements to be considered a foreign bank under Canadian law and be exempt from paying tax to the Canada Revenue Agency, Justice Department lawyer Elizabeth Chasson said in her closing arguments at the Tax Court of Canada.There is “absolutely nothing” connecting Glenhuron to Barbados, she told Justice Campbell Miller, and the subsidiary was established to avoid paying tax.“It has no customers in Barbados. It’s not trying to break into the financial services business in Barbados, because it’s only earning profit for itself in a very sophisticated, very complicated system.”The trial centred on the federal government’s reassessments of Loblaw’s subsidiary for several tax years dating as far back as 2001, and began after the company filed an appeal in 2015. The Minister of Finance concluded the income earned by Glenhuron was from an “investment business” and therefore subject to income tax, according to court documents.The reassessments, which were received between 2015 and 2018, are for the 2000 to 2013 taxation years and total $437 million of taxes, interest and penalties owed, according to Loblaw’s latest quarterly financial report.Loblaws Inc. was incorporated as an international business corporation in Barbados in September 1992 and its activities included investing in short-term securities and holding cross-currency swaps, according to court documents.Loblaws Inc. changed its name to Glenhuron Bank Ltd. in November 1993 and in December 1993 it became a licensee under the Offshore Banking Act of Barbados.Glenhuron was liquidated in 2013, when Loblaw decided to use that capital domestically to buy Shoppers Drug Mart.Department of Justice lawyers had argued during the trial, which began in April, that Loblaw Financial took steps to make Glenhuron Bank appear to be a foreign bank in order to avoid paying tax.Loblaw has argued that Glenhuron qualified for the “regulated foreign bank” exception.The majority of Glenhuron’s activities involved arms-length entities, such as swap contracts with large banks, and its banking licence from Barbadian authorities is further evidence that it fits the profile of a bank, Loblaw lawyer Al Meghji has told the court.Although Glenhuron had a banking license from the Barbados authorities, it did not take deposits or provide financial services to outside customers, Chasson argued on Wednesday, but rather largely used its own funds in transactions such as buying short-term securities.Banks typically take customers’ deposits and use it for lending and investments, she noted.“The key difference is it comes from the customers, from the public,” Chasson said. “But here, it’s all within the Loblaw/Weston family.”By entering into swap contracts and purchasing short-term securities Glenhuron is acting as a customer, rather than conducting business with arms-length parties and generating profits, Chasson argued.“Glenhuron could have been operated anywhere,” she told the court. “It has nothing to do with Barbados in particular. The only thing about Barbados is it’s a low tax jurisdiction. That’s it.”Companies in this story: (TSX:L)last_img read more

Spanish NGOs Call for Release of SahrawiBorn Spanish Woman Held in

Tarragona (Spain) – Moroccan and Spanish NGOs staged Thursday in Tarragona (south of Catalonia) a new demonstration in solidarity with Mahjouba Mohamed Hamdidaf, a Spanish young woman of Sahrawi descent held in captivity since last summer by the Polisario in the Tindouf camps in Algeria.Dozens of Spanish human rights activists took part in this sit-in which is part of a series of demonstrations scheduled by Moroccan and Spanish NGOs across Spain in order to put pressure on the Polisario and uncover the repressive policies of this separatist movement against the Saharawi population held in captivity in the Algeria-based camps.The protestors chanted slogans urging the immediate release of the young woman, blaming the Polisario and Algeria for this detention and calling them to ensure the young woman safety.

National Bank to hike dividend as profit boosted by stronger wealth and

MONTREAL — National Bank of Canada increased its fourth-quarter net income to $330 million and its adjusted earnings to $407 million.The adjusted earnings were up 14 per cent compared with $353 million a year earlier, while net income rose a modest three per cent from $320 million.The Montreal-based bank also announced that its dividend will rise about four per cent to 50 cents per common share, with the Feb. 1 payment to shareholders.

No pomp and pageantry for Maithripalas second anniversary

The second anniversary of President Maithripala Sirisena’s inauguration in office will be celebrated on 08th January 2017 without pomp and pageantry.Media Minister Gayantha Karunatillake said that all public institutions have been instructed to commence projects that can be implemented immediately under the 2017 budget proposals. He said that development activities that are more fruitful to the public will also commence in line with the celebration. (Colombo Gazette)

Parody of 1980s Accrington Stanley advert banned for encouraging excessive drinking

first_imgBlack Cow pure milk vodka, in a parody of the well-known 1989 Accrington Stanley milk advertCredit:PA Among them was a parody of the Milk Marketing Board’s infamous 1989 milk advert featuring Carl Rice as a young boy. In the original, two Liverpudlian boys who have been playing football come into a kitchen for a drink.One boy tells the other football legend Ian Rush had warned that people who did not drink milk would be “only good enough to play for Accrington Stanley”. The commercial popularised the catchphrase: “Accrington Stanley? Who are they?… Exactly!”Rice, now aged 36, features in the parody skit this time gulping down milk vodka, invented by Dorset dairy farmer Jason Barber. But the ASA ruled the advert implied and encouraged “excessive drinking”.  An advert for Black Cow pure milk vodka, in a parody of the well-known 1989 Accrington Stanley milk advertCredit:PA The ASA said that the adverts’ catchline, “So smooth you can drink it until the cows come home”, implied consumers could drink more of it. Black Cow said its vodka was “super premium” and not intended to be consumed in excess.Beaminster dairy farmer Jason Barber, who invented the drink, added: “We don’t want to milk the point, but we were rather surprised to be chased by these complaints.” A parody advert of the famous “Accrington Stanley” milk advert from the 1980s which features the original actor has been banned for encouraging excessive drinking.The adverts for a UK farm’s pure milk vodka were pulled by watchdogs for being socially irresponsible and linking the spirit to sexual activity. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Adverts for Black Cow pure milk vodka banned Black Cow pure milk vodka, in a parody of the well-known 1989 Accrington Stanley milk advert The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) said they received two complaints about the adverts for Black Cow vodka and three adverts have now been banned. Adverts for Black Cow pure milk vodka have been bannedCredit:PA The ASA said that while they recognised it was “a literal recreation of the original advert and that some viewers would recognise the element of satire”, they believed it should be banned on the grounds of the huge amount of vodka depicted.Another advert to fall foul of the censors showed a man and woman walking through a meadow and glancing at each other, and then a depression in long grass with “Black Cow Pure Milk Vodka” superimposed over it. The watchdog argued it linked alcohol to sexual activity. Black Cow pure milk vodka, in a parody of the well-known 1989 Accrington Stanley milk advertlast_img read more

Leading Wall Street banks establish The Carbon Principles

first_imgThree of the world’s leading financial institutions have established The Carbon Principles, climate change guidelines for advisors and lenders to power companies in the USA. These Principles are the result of a nine-month intensive effort to create an approach to evaluating and addressing carbon risks in the financing of electric power projects. They say the need for this “is driven by the risks faced by the power industry as utilities, independent producers, regulators, lenders and investors deal with the uncertainties around regional and national climate change policy.  The Principles were developed in partnership by Citi, JPMorgan Chase and Morgan Stanley, and in consultation with leading power companies American Electric Power (AEP), CMS Energy, DTE Energy, NRG Energy, PSEG, Sempra and Southern Company. Environmental Defense and the Natural Resources Defense Council. Environmental NGOs also advised on the creation of the Principles. This effort is the first time a group of banks has come together and consulted with power companies and environmental groups to develop a process for understanding carbon risk around power sector investments needed to meet future economic growth and the needs of consumers for reliable and affordable energy. The consortium has developed an Enhanced Diligence framework to help lenders better understand and evaluate the potential carbon risks associated with coal plant investments. Renewable and low carbon distributed energy technologies. Renewable energy and low carbon distributed energy technologies hold considerable promise for meeting the electricity needs of the US while also leveraging American technology and creating jobs. We will encourage clients to invest in cost-effective renewables and distributed technologies, taking into consideration the value of avoided CO2 emissions. We will also encourage legislative and regulatory changes that remove barriers to, and promote such investments (including related investments in infrastructure and equipment needed to support the connection of renewable sources to the system). We will consider production increases from renewable and low carbon generation as part of the Enhanced Diligence process and assess their impact on proposed financings of certain new fossil fuel generation. “A rational set of carbon principles to help guide energy investment strategy is vital to our nation’s energy and economic future,” said Michael G. Morris, Chairman, President and CDEO of AEP. “Recognising that energy efficiency, renewables, cleaner fossil technologies and other diverse solutions all have significant roles in addressing climate challenges while maintaining economic and energy security establishes a framework for making the best decisions regarding our nation’s energy future.”  “The electric companies that serve America’s families and businesses every day understand the need for a balanced approach to meet our country’s energy needs. At CMS Energy, our objective is to provide reliable and affordable power to our customers through a prudent, environmentally responsible mix of conventional and advanced technologies that includes renewable energy and to work with customers to help them use energy efficiently. By adopting these principles, Wall Street is making an important and creative contribution to the ongoing effort to address climate change and a contribution that will be welcomed by those in the utility sector with similar concerns about the environment.”  Dale Bryk, Senior Attorney at the Natural Resources Defense Council added, “Expectations are rising fast for this industry. Global warming is changing the competitive landscape. Clean power is the name of the game today. Conventional coal facilities are already facing intensive scrutiny. We think the serious money is increasingly going to be on clean, efficient solutions.”  The Principles are:Energy efficiency. An effective way to limit CO2 emissions is to not produce them. The signatory financial institutions will encourage clients to invest in cost-effective demand reduction, taking into consideration the value of avoided CO2 emissions. We will also encourage regulatory and legislative changes that increase efficiency in electricity consumption including the removal of barriers to investment in cost-effective demand reduction. The institutions will consider demand reduction caused by increased energy efficiency (or other means) as part of the Enhanced Diligence Process and assess its impact on proposed financings of certain new fossil fuel generation. “Southern Company, along with our regulators and other stakeholders, has and will continue to undertake extensive evaluation of all generation resources including nuclear, coal, natural gas, renewables and energy efficiency, to maintain the balanced portfolio necessary to reliably meet our customers’ growing electricity needs. We regard bank due diligence as a normal part of our business and we applaud the banks for seeking input from the electricity industry as they developed the Carbon Principles.”“The so-called ‘Carbon Principles’ reflect the tremendous pressure felt by members of the financial industry for their investments in coal and other greenhouse gas-intensive industries,” according to Rainforest Action Network (RAN). It is calling on banks to end all coal investments and says, “the Carbon Principles are an important step toward recognising the climate risks associated with financing coal plants but are limited by their lack of any binding commitments and their failure to address the impact of destructive coal extraction methods such as mountaintop removal mining.”“The proof is in the pollution,” said Rebecca Tarbotton, Director of RAN’s Global Finance Campaign. “If this policy prevents the financing of new coal, it will be productive.” “There was full and frank dialogue around the table,” said Matt Arnold, director of Sustainable Finance, which helped co-ordinate the development of the Principles and Enhanced Diligence process. “There was a remarkable amount of debate and exchange of information and views among the banks, power companies and environmental organizations. The dialogue resulted in a rigorous analysis of the carbon risks in power investments, and sets the stage for further discussion.”center_img “DTE Energy is proud of its history of environmental stewardship and thus we applaud the Carbon Principles approach by leading banks recognizing that a broad range of energy solutions must be considered to address the climate change issue,” said Anthony F. Earley Jr., Chairman and CEO of DTE Energy.  Sempra Energy, San Diego: “With its mix of energy efficiency, renewable energy and clean conventional generation, the Carbon Principles echo our view that to meet future US energy needs, a balanced portfolio approach must use energy efficiency, renewable energy, and natural gas.”  Conventional and advanced generation. In addition to cost effective energy efficiency, renewables and low carbon distributed generation, investments in conventional or advanced generating facilities will be needed to supply reliable electric power to the US market. This may include power from natural gas, coal and nuclear technologies. Due to evolving climate policy, investing in CO2-emitting fossil fuel generation entails uncertain financial, regulatory and certain environmental liability risks. It is the purpose of the Enhanced Diligence process to assess and reflect these risks in the financing considerations for certain fossil fuel generation. We will encourage regulatory and legislative changes that facilitate carbon capture and storage (CCS) to further reduce CO2 emissions from the electric sector.“Leading utilities and financial institutions understand that the rules of the road have changed for coal,” said Mark Brownstein, Managing Director of business partnerships for Environmental Defense, one of the NGOs that advised with the banks in creating the Principles. “These principles are a first step in facilitating an honest assessment of electric generation options in light of the obvious and pressing need to substantially reduce national greenhouse gas pollution.” “To move the needle on global warming, clean energy technologies need to be developed, demonstrated and deployed as quickly as possible,” said David Crane, President and CEO of NRG Energy. “Given the capital intensive nature of this challenge, we welcome these carbon principles as a sign that America’s leading financial institutions are ready to support a massive increase of investment in clean energy solutions. With the support of both Wall Street and public policymakers in Washington, the American power industry can lead the way in achieving the dramatic GHG reductions that are critical to the health of both our economy and our planet.”  Citi, JPMorgan Chase and Morgan Stanley have pledged their commitment to the Principles to use as a framework when talking about these issues with clients. This effort creates a consistent approach among major lenders and advisors in evaluating climate change risks and opportunities in the US electric power industry. The Principles and associated Enhanced Diligence represent a first step in a process aimed at providing banks and their power industry clients with a consistent roadmap for reducing the regulatory and financial risks associated with greenhouse gas emissions. The Principles recognise the benefits of a portfolio approach to meeting the power needs of consumers, without prescribing how power companies should act to meet these needs. However, if high carbon dioxide-emitting technologies are selected by power companies, the signatory banks have agreed to follow the Enhanced Diligence process and factor these risks and potential mitigants into the final financing decision. “The Carbon Principles encourage all stakeholders to recognise that energy efficiency, renewables and new low-carbon power sources are all indispensable to meeting the nation’s future energy needs while addressing climate change as one of the foremost policy and environmental issues of our time,” said Ralph Izzo, Chairman, President and CEO of PSEG. “PSEG is actively pursuing this overall goal, while recognizing that our efforts must result in a reasonable cost to consumers. We hope that the Principles will contribute to the national consensus that must be reached to deal effectively with these critical issues.”last_img read more

VIDEO SEHA GAZPROM League TOP 5 goals – Round 1

The first round of SEHA GAZPROM League is behind us. Take a closer look on the BEST 5 goals of the first week of the season and choose the best one on SEHA GAZPROM League Facebook page.Mandatory Credit ©SEHA/ Uros Hočevar ← Previous Story MACHULLA’S TIME: SG Flensburg break “black series” against RN Lowen! Next Story → MORE AND MORE POWERFUL: Eivind Tangen to Skjern Handbold!

La France placée sous surveillance par Reporters sans frontières

first_imgLa France placée “sous surveillance” par Reporters sans frontièresL’ONG a classé la France dans la liste des pays “sous surveillance” en ce qui concerne la liberté d’expression sur Internet.Si “la France n’est pas la Chine ni l’Iran”, selon les mots de Lucie Morillon, responsable du bureau Nouveaux Médias à Reporters sans frontières (RSF), l’Hexagone n’en est pas moins placé “sous surveillance” en matière de liberté d’expression sur le web par l’ONG. “Il est important pour nous de regarder les pratiques des pays répressifs, mais aussi ce que font nos démocraties, et en l’occurrence il y a un certain nombre de choses qui nous ont inquiétés sur la France”, explique-t-elle ainsi pour justifier le placement de la France dans la liste de 16 pays où cette liberté semble en danger. Si 10 autres pays, dont la Chine, l’Iran ou Cuba, sont qualifiés d'”ennemis d’Internet”, la situation française inquiète.À lire aussi”Choc Climatique” : les propositions du Sénat pour que la France agisseCe sont notamment les lois Hadopi et Loppsi 2 qui sont dans le collimateur de RSF. Selon Lucie Morillon, “au nom de buts tout à fait légitimes” comme la lutte contre la pédo-pornographie, ces deux législations “mettent en place des mécanismes qui peuvent se révéler dangereux pour la liberté d’expression en ligne”. Concernant Hadopi, la coupure d’une connexion sous prétexte de téléchargements illégaux est “inacceptable” pour RSF, qui voit là une violation d’un “droit fondamental”. Quant à Loppsi 2, Reporters sans frontières dénonce “la mise en place d’un filtrage administratif du Web sans décision judiciaire : une fois le cadre ‘psychologique’ franchi, un certain nombre d’autres raisons peuvent être utilisées pour filtrer d’autres sites Internet”. Sur la question du journalisme, Lucie Morillon se montre toute aussi inquiète. “Il est difficile d’établir des responsabilités, mais 2010 a été difficile pour les journalistes qui enquêtaient sur des affaires sensibles. Il y a un certain nombre de pressions sur les sources qui créent un climat assez inquiétant pour le journalisme en ligne en France”, lance-t-elle en faisant notamment référence aux cambriolages et vols d’information de journalistes de Mediapart ou Rue89 dans l’affaire Woerth-Bettencourt. “Le fait que la France soit placée sous surveillance n’est pas surprenant, cela fait plusieurs années qu’on voit un dangereux glissement en France, où les mesures les plus répressives passent. La majorité et le gouvernement mènent une espèce de croisade contre Internet”, juge pour sa part Jérémie Zimmermann, porte-parole de l’organisation La Quadrature du Net. Le 15 mars 2011 à 14:03 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Royal Oaks Country Club plans parking expansion

first_imgRoyal Oaks Country Club plans to build additional parking, including a lot for 50 vehicles, according to a document filed with the city of Vancouver.The new parking is being considered in two phases. One phase is an 18-space parallel parking expansion along the existing main access drive from Northeast Fourth Plain Boulevard; the other is the parking lot on an unimproved parcel adjacent to the golf course, according to the pre-application. Available funding and other considerations will determine which phase takes place first, the pre-application project description says.Additional parking is needed for overflow parking during the Christmas bazaar, golf tournaments and other large events at the club, 8917 N.E. Fourth Plain Blvd. The construction site listed on the pre-application is 3709 N.E. Royal View Ave., west of the club entrance.last_img

Muller I am envious of the engine in Mbappes butt

first_imgThomas Muller admits that the one thing that he is jealous about Kylian Mbappe is the “engine” inside the butt of the speedy France youngsterGermany and France played out a goalless draw in Munich on Thursday.While the 2018 World Cup winners appeared rusty, Mbappe continued to impress.Having now witnessed the 19-year-old first hand with his clever little tricks and pace, Muller is feeling a little envious.“He has an engine in his butt that everyone else wants to have,” the German forward joked on SportsKeeda.“He makes one fast step and leaves the opponent behind. You have to defend players like him with more than one player, even if he leaves one player behind the next one has to try to stop him.“That’s the only way you can stop remarkable players like him. Of course, he had some moments during the game that the spectators enjoyed.”Revealed: Florentino Perez’s plan to sign Kylian Mbappe Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 12, 2019 According to a report from ‘El Chiringuito’, Florentino Perez revealed his plans to sign Kylian Mbappe from PSG next season.We all knew this was…It was the first time Germany had played following their disastrous World Cup campaign at Russia and Mesut Ozil’s controversial decision to retire from international football.“We had a lot of pressure before the game,” Muller said.“But we responded in the way we had to.“You have to make distinctions. It wasn’t our best game and we have a lot to pay back. That was the first key step, but that’s all.”??????… pic.twitter.com/vWzfiIYNgR— Kylian Mbappé (@KMbappe) September 6, 2018last_img read more

Cantwell WA to get new storm radar 1 year early

first_imgSEATTLE (AP) — U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell says Washington state will get state-of-the-art coastal Doppler radar in September 2011, a year earlier than originally expected. The Washington Democrat said Wednesday the technology will help ensure more accurate weather forecasts for the Pacific Northwest. Previously, she says Washington weather radar coverage has been “shockingly inadequate, putting lives and property at risk.”The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has found a radar that can be obtained from the Air Force and modified for use in Washington. The technology will be able to scan weather systems vertically as well as horizontally, helping the National Weather Service better predict the type, intensity and duration of precipitation.The Weather Service will announce radar site finalists in late June.last_img

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Ferreira Knibbs Named To Deans List At Quinnipiac

first_imgHAMDEN, CT — Wilmington students Victoria Ferreira and Madison Knibbs have been named to the Dean’s List at Quinnipiac University for the Spring of 2019.To qualify for the Dean’s List, students must earn a grade point average of at least 3.5 with no grade lower than C. Full-time students must complete at least 14 credits in a semester, with at least 12 credits that have been graded on a letter grade basis to be eligible. Part-time students must complete at least six credits during a semester.About Quinnipiac UniversityQuinnipiac is a private, coeducational, nonsectarian institution located 90 minutes north of New York City and two hours from Boston. The university enrolls 6,400 full-time undergraduate and 2,300 graduate students in 58 undergraduate and more than 20 graduate programs of study in its School of Business and Engineering, School of Communications, School of Education, School of Health Sciences, School of Law, Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine, School of Nursing and College of Arts and Sciences. Quinnipiac consistently ranks among the top regional universities in the North in U.S. News & World Report’s America’s Best Colleges issue. For more information, please visit http://www.quinnipiac.edu.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Quinnipiac.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Ferreira & Knibbs Named To Dean’s List At Quinnipiac UniversityIn “Education”Wilmington’s Victoria Ferreira Named To Dean’s List At Quinnipiac UniversityIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Madison Knibbs Named To Dean’s List At Quinnipiac UniversityIn “Education”last_img read more

5000 Rohingya shelters destroyed in rains

first_imgAt least 10 people have died and thousands of shanty homes have been destroyed by monsoon rains in overcrowded Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh’s southeast, officials said Sunday.Bangladesh’s meteorological department said the Cox’s Bazar district — home to nearly one million Rohingya Muslims who have fled a military crackdown in Myanmar — has seen at least 58.5 centimetres (nearly two feet) of rain since 2 July.An International Organisation for Migration (IOM) spokeswoman said heavy rains triggered mudslides in the refugee camps — which are mostly built on hill-slopes — destroying some 4,889 tarpaulin and bamboo shacks in the first two weeks of July.More than 200 landslides have been reported since April in the camps, built near the border with Myanmar, and at least 10 people were killed, a UN report said, adding nearly 50,000 people have been affected.In the last week alone, two Rohingya minors died and another 6,000 people were left without shelter because of heavy rains.The UN said the schooling of some 60,000 children had been interrupted with over 750 learning centres partially damaged and five heavily damaged.Displaced refugees said they were suffering as rain disrupted logistics and daily activity in the camps.”It’s tough to go to food distribution centres by wading through a swamp of mud,” Nurun Jan, a Rohingya refugee, told AFP.”Rains and gusty wind have made our life miserable.”Refugees also described a shortage of drinking water and a looming health crisis due to flooded toilets, which foster disease outbreaks.World Food Programme (WFP) spokeswoman Gemma Snowdon said they had to significantly increase assistance in the camps to cope up with the monsoon.”So far 11,400 people have required the extra food assistance due to the heavy rains, compared to 7,000 during the whole of July 2018,” she said.Last year the UN refugee agency moved 30,000 Rohingya out of areas considered at high risk of landslides and floods.Heavy rains frequently trigger flooding and landslides in Bangladesh’s southeastern hill districts, and in 2017 at least 170 people were killed.Some 740,000 Rohingya fled a military crackdown in Buddhist-dominated Myanmar’s Rakhine state in August 2017, joining about 200,000 already living in camps in Bangladesh.Officials said landslides were increasing in the region because forests had been cleared to make way for the sprawling Rohingya camps. One of the settlements, Kutupalong, is now the world’s largest refugee centre.Refugee homes are particularly susceptible to damage or destruction because Bangladeshi authorities will only allow them to be built with tarpaulin, twine, bamboo, or other flimsy materials to maintain the “temporary” character of the camp, according to the New York-based Human Rights Watch (HRW).A senior Bangladesh official told AFP the government has barred permanent structures as they hope the refugees will eventually return home.Bangladesh wants to relocate up to 100,000 refugees to Bhashan Char, a remote island in the Bay of Bengal, but this is opposed by the Rohingya and international rights groups.Dhaka says any relocation to the island would be voluntary.last_img read more

Houston Sends Supplies And Donations To Survivors Of Floods In Baton Rouge

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share Listen X Al OrtizHouston Mayor Sylvester Turner (center) underscored how quickly Houstonians reacted to help the flood survivors in Baton Rouge.Houstonians are helping Baton Rouge residents recover from the recent massive floods through an effort that has partnered the City of Houston with local religious and civic organizations.After seeing the devastation in Baton Rouge, Mayor Sylvester Turner asked Houstonians to make donations to help in the recovery process.Local churches served as drop-off locations that collected water, cleaning products, school supplies and clothes.Two trucks set out from Houston to transport the donations to Louisiana on Thursday.Moments before their departure, Turner said he was proud of the response from Houstonians.“Whether you gave a little bit or whether you gave a lot, the reality is for people who have lost everything that little bit means a lot, you know, to all of them,” he said.“Churches, non-profits, Houstonians on short, short notice, turned out in a huge, huge way,” Turner underscored.DeAndre Sam, president and CEO of A – Rocket Moving and Storage, the company that’s transporting the donations, said people were still making donations on Thursday.“So, I’m pretty sure there’ll probably be an opportunity to take some other stuff down somewhat at a later date as well and we’d be willing to do that as well,” Sam said. Turner says the distribution of the donations will be coordinated with Baton Rouge Mayor Kip Holden.Since President Barack Obama’s major disaster declaration to 20 parishes in South Louisiana, more than 120,000 households have registered for FEMA assistance. 00:00 /01:17last_img read more

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first_img Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  IBA Dosimetryâ??s Commissioning Services is a customer focused, one price solutions for implementation of your new radiation therapy technology that meets your goals and timeframes. IBA Dosimetry builds the fastest, most accurate, and most reliable data collection package in the world in the Blue Phantom 2 and Linear Diode Array LDA-99. New advanced treatment modalities like RapidArc or VMAT can be implemented faster based on our deep know how. Because we utilize our own staff and equipment, you do not have to worry about system performance or stressing your physics staff with additional workload. Proven, Experienced, and Professionalâ?¦ Let IBA Dosimetry take the worries out of linac and TPS commissioning.For more information: www.iba-worldwide.com CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.”center_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Conference Coverage View all 396 items Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Information Technology View all 220 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Videos | October 18, 2011 IBA Commissioning Service â?? Proven, Experienced, Professional Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Canadian numbers are up 29 new hotels this year for Hong Kong

first_img Friday, February 17, 2017 Share Tags: Asia Pacific, China, Hong Kong Posted by Travelweek Group center_img TORONTO — At its ‘Year of the Rooster Appreciation Reception’ in Toronto last night, the Hong Kong Tourism Board announced a 3% increase in tourist arrivals from Canada in 2016 compared to the previous year.The destination welcomed 369,363 Canadians last year. Overnight visitors had an overall 2.9% increase while same-day visits increased by 3.3%. Hong Kong welcomed approximately 56.655 million tourists in 2016, a decrease of 4.5% from 2015, even though international tourism is up.The overall number of mainland same-day tourists decreased in 2016 by 6.7%, most likely due to the implementation of the ‘one week per visit policy’. There was an increase of 3.1% from international visitors from both short- and long-haul markets. International overnight arrivals also increased by 5.7% with short-haul markets increasing by 8.4%.Hong Kong has a released a new global tourism campaign, ‘Best of All, It’s in Hong Kong’ featuring a series of commercials starring famous locals with different topics highlighting food and gourmet dining, fashion and entertainment, family adventures and the great outdoors. New tours and events will be featured for each theme.More news:  Consolidation in the cruise industry as PONANT set to acquire Paul Gauguin CruisesThe destination expects to open 29 new hotels by the end of 2017, increasing the current number of over 250 hotels available by 74,000 rooms.“We want visitors to see, feel and have a taste of the best Hong Kong can offer through the eyes of locals through this campaign,” said Michael Lim, Hong Kong Tourism Board Director for Canada, Central & South America. “This new brand campaign will take Hong Kong to new heights as a destination by connecting and inspiring people to travel here and experience the best and most authentic Hong Kong moments.”Travel to Hong Kong is getting easier with an average of 19 direct flights in service. New flights and routes to Hong Kong and other Asian destinations are increasing with airlines such as Cathay Pacific, Hong Kong Airlines, Air Canada, China Southern, China Eastern and Hainan Airlines.William Wang, Business Development Manager for Cathay Pacific, told Travelweek that there will be three new flights direct from Vancouver to Hong Kong, starting March 28. Between June 24 and Sept. 4, four double-daily flights from Toronto will be in service.More news:  Onex paying big to get WestJet and that will send airfares soaring, says CWTHong Kong is also encouraging multi-destination travel with their partners in China, Thailand, and its newest partner Taiwan. Canadian numbers are up, 29 new hotels this year for Hong Kong << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

Anantara Medjumbe Island reopens with refreshed style

first_imgAnantara Medjumbe Island reopens with refreshed styleSecluded on a pristine private island in the Quirimbas Archipelago off the northern coast of Mozambique, Anantara Medjumbe Island Resort has reopened following an extensive refurbishment. The 12-villa, adults-only African island hideaway now features refreshed décor, luxury villa upgrades and new signature experiences, including a Robinson Crusoe-style star bed for the ultimate romantic escape.Naturally intimate, Medjumbe Island is a mere one kilometre long and 300 metres wide. Tranquil seclusion in paradise is matched by convenient access, just a 45 minute light aircraft transfer from Pemba International Airport, which can be reached from Mozambique’s capital Maputo or international flights from Johannesburg or Dar es Salaam. Now, with a host of enhancements, the resort has reopened to offer more unique signature experiences and natural attractions and will soon be the only African island resort to use 100% solar energy.Refreshed décor gives Anantara Medjumbe a distinctive African island identity. The resort has been extensively restyled using colourful patterns to depict the vibrancy of local culture.  Shades of blue and aqua reflect the evolving hues of the Indian Ocean. All of the 12 thatched Beach Pool Villas, which open onto soft powdery sands, exude a sense of natural luxury, including newly designed private splash pools with an aqua mosaic finish, and a built-in Champagne step to sip bubbles while admiring the Indian Ocean view. In the guest villas and public areas, the majority of furniture and lighting was custom designed by interior designers, Savile Row, and produced in Indonesia and South Africa with incredible attention to detail. Various accessories were sourced from around the African continent and framed artworks were created using traditional wax printed capulana fabrics that were sourced from local markets.Surrounding Medjumbe Island, Quirimbas National Park boasts an impressive number of pristine coral reefs that attract an abundance of marine life, making it one of the world’s best snorkelling and scuba diving destinations, as well as a prime haven for dolphin and whale watching boat trips. The turtles which are frequently sighted in the water also come ashore to lay their eggs – often right in front of Anantara’s beachfront villas. Water sport thrills range from water skiing to wake- and knee-boarding. Romantics can travel by dhow sailing boat to picnic on a deserted island, or set off at dusk for a Champagne sunset cruise.Adding to the wide range of ocean experiences, the resort’s new dhow sailing boat lesson offers couples a bonding 90-minute experience on the turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean, with the option of both taking up the challenge of mastering traditional techniques, or one relaxing onboard and cheering on their partner. Guided by a team of three experienced local skippers, guests learn how to work the ropes, check for wind direction, control the sail and steer. The brand new Robinson Crusoe-style star bed experience invites couples to spend a night sleeping in a king size four-poster bed surrounded by lanterns, underneath a twinkling night sky.Source = Anantara Medjumbelast_img read more