India probed over needles in Commonwealth Games village

first_imgMOST READ LATEST STORIES In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery Indian athletes were facing investigations on Saturday after the discovery of syringes in their accommodation at the Commonwealth Games in Australia.A cleaner at the athletes’ village tipped off authorities about the syringes, which will now be analyzed, Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) chief executive David Grevemberg said.ADVERTISEMENT Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ Batang Gilas arrives in China for Fiba U16 Asian Championship Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award He added: “If analytical evidence indicates it’s worth a follow-up, the CGF medical commission will follow these procedures as set out in the anti-doping standard.”Grevemberg refused to reveal whether athletes at the accommodation would undergo extra testing, stressing that the “element of surprise” was important in catching drug cheats.“Obviously, we don’t want athletes that are cheating on the field of play or in the Games,” he said.However, India team manager, Ajay Narang, denied the needles were anything to do with them, saying they were found inside a water bottle on a path outside.“One of my guys reported that to us. I had a look and could see these were syringes,” Narang told AFP.ADVERTISEMENT Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew View comments Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil “As a good citizen, I immediately went to the Medical Commission office for analysis and disposal. We didn’t open the bottle at all.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next He added that the Commonwealth Games has a “no-needles” policy for athletes — and “zero tolerance” for doping. The Games will open in Gold Coast on Wednesday.The Indian team denied any wrongdoing or that the syringes were even in their rooms.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown“The CGF medical commission responded to a report from a cleaner of the presence of needles in the athletes’ accommodation in the Games village,” Grevemberg said.“Under the 2018 Commonwealth Games anti-doping standard, a no-needle policy applies to athletes for the entire Games period, unless under approved exemptions.”last_img read more

Shareholder agreement being finalized – AG

first_imgLocal law schoolA local law school will be established here in Guyana, Attorney General and Legal Affairs Minister, Basil Williams, has said. The Guyana Government plans to go ahead with its plans in this regard, despite several concerns having been raised relative to the process of establishing this law school. Government is now in the process of finalising a shareholders’ agreement in pursuance of this objective.Government had, in January 2017, announced it would start a project to establish the JOF Haynes Law School of the Americas through a public-private partnership entered into between the Government, the Law School of the Americas (LCA), and the University College of the Caribbean (UCC).Several burning concerns were brought to the fore, especially in relation to whether approval was granted by the Council for Legal Education (CLE), and whether the programme was accredited. Former Minister Anil Nandlall’s main concern is whether Guyanese be able to practice law throughout the Caribbean.According to Williams, a recently completed Canadian-funded study into legal education in the region has recommended the establishment of law schools here, Antigua and Jamaica. It also recommended that the CLE serve as a regulatory body, rather than one that manages the day to day affairs of law schools.The minister said he supports these recommendations and it is now left up to the regional Governments to discuss and decide on this matter at the Caribbean Community (Caricom) level. He noted however that this study only helps to bolster Guyana’s request to have a law school established here.“We are confident that we really need a law school,” Williams told the media as he explained the recent increased tuition fees at the Hugh Wooding Law School and the difficulty of having Guyanese students live and study in Trinidad and Tobago also support Guyana’s push in this direction.To substantiate his point, the minister said, “Tuition fees this year have been increased at Hugh Wooding and are now TT$97,000…, well over $3 million (Guyana dollars)…that’s only for tuition, they still have to live and exist in Trinidad.”He also made the point that Trinidad and Barbados churn out at least 200law graduates yearly, while Guyana is allowed to have only 25 or less lawyers trained on an annual basis. Williams noted that with the impending oil and gas sector, Guyana would need more trained and competent lawyers.“…especially at this time, with how Guyana is poised…we would need lawyers to deal with oil and gas, we would need lawyers to deal with the green state and economy. So we have a lot of capacity to build.”Williams is adamant that Guyana has not been refused permission to set up a law school here. As such, preparations are being made to advance this process with the identification of space at the University of Guyana (UG) Turkeyen campus, where the proposed school would be built.The AG has said, however, that while UG has identified 15 acres of the 150 acres that it has situated close to the area that houses the Forensic Laboratory, the amount would not be sufficient. While the CLE has agreed to establish a law school in Guyana, approval would be granted only after a feasibility study is conducted.Williams had attacked CLE Chairman Reginald Armour for responding to the concerns raised by former Legal Affairs Minister Anil Nandlall without consulting with the current Government on the matter. He said this was one of the reasons why the establishment of this law school was delayed, and it had nothing to do with non-approval.Williams maintains that a Review Committee could not overrule a decision taken by the Council in 2017 in regard to the issue of whether Guyana should be allowed to build a law school.The AG had said members of Guyana’s committee included the Chancellor of the Judiciary (ag), Yonette Cummings-Edwards; Chief Justice (ag), Roxane George; Retired Justices Duke Pollard, Claudette Singh and Rudolph James; Professor Harold Lutchman, and the Registrar of UG, Dr Nigel Gravesande.last_img read more