Hasler: Errors to blame, not penalties

first_imgAfter starting brightly, the Bulldogs scored the opening try of the game through winger Marcelo Montoya and for the first 35 minutes were arguably the team with the greater share of momentum.But an error by Adam Elliott in the 32nd minute, a penalty against Josh Morris and a knock-on call against Morris as he lunged desperately to stop James Roberts from scoring gifted Brisbane territory and possession which they duly turned into two tries and a 10-point lead at half-time.The possession flow continued to run the way of the home side to start the second half but the Canterbury defence held firm until successive penalties for interference on players chasing kicks gave the home side the impetus with which to score three tries in the space of six minutes.Hasler wouldn’t be drawn on the impact of the penalties in what has become an ambiguous area, instead highlighting the errors prior to half-time that allowed Brisbane to gain the ascendancy.”We’re pretty disappointed with the outcome and the performance tonight,” Hasler said.”I thought we were really good early to be honest. I thought we got away to a good start but again we were probably our own worst enemies.”We just had the momentum our way and we had a couple of crucial errors which were momentum changers for us.”For much of the second half the Bulldogs resembled a boxer stuck on the ropes and holding on for dear life, Brisbane using the weight of possession nudging up near 80 per cent to pound away at the try-line until the opposition relented.Besides Josh Reynolds trying in vain to rein in an Anthony Milford kick the Bulldogs went 15 minutes without touching the ball, captain Aiden Tolman conceding the lack of possession had to eventually take its toll.”It was hard that start of the second half,” Tolman said.”I thought we started the first half really strong. We probably didn’t deserve to be two tries down that first half but we were and we had to come out and complete and we didn’t.”When you give any team that much possession in that field position sooner or later you’re going to crack.”On the back of the [9-4] penalty count, repeat sets that they got, they were too good tonight and they made us pay.”Like they did in their last start win against the Knights the Bulldogs made a late change to their starting team by shifting Moses Mbye into hooker, pushing Michael Lichaa back to the bench and promoting Matt Frawley into the halves.After playing five minutes against the Knights Lichaa only featured for eight minutes against the Broncos, Hasler still to decide how they will line up in future as the mathematicians are brought in to assess their finals hopes.”We’ll have a look at it,” Hasler said.”We just thought we’d mix it up a little bit. We started that way two weeks ago against Newcastle.”There were a couple of soft tries there but I thought our boys tried pretty hard for tonight. Their execution again let us down.”last_img read more

Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires

first_img Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires 0 Comments   Share   “He’s explosive,” Arizona Cardinals linebacker Karlos Dansby said of Williams. “He’s very decisive in the way he wants to go with the ball. He’s a downhill runner. His ability to one cut and go fits in well with that offensive scheme.”It fits in well, largely because Mike Shula’s unit isn’t solely dependent on Williams’ production. In addition to the former Pro Bowler, the Panthers have a ground-and-pound bruiser in fullback Mike Tolbert (19 rushes for 53 yards and a touchdown), a veteran wide receiver, Steve Smith, who keeps corners and safeties honest (14 catches for 143 yards and a touchdown) and a 6-foot-5 quarterback, Cam Newton, who is as strong as he is fast (16 rushes for 98 yards and a touchdown, including a season-high seven carries for 45 yards in Week 3).“The biggest thing for them is their quarterback,” Cardinals head coach Bruce Arians said. “When you have a quarterback that’s big and strong, it’s like trying to bring down a tight end. When he fakes he makes everyone cautious. You can’t play good run defense cautious. That’s the thing a running quarterback like Cam Newton makes you do.” Top Stories Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Although the Cardinals haven’t gone up against a three-pronged rushing attack like they’ll face Sunday at University of Phoenix Stadium, their ability to stop the run has been a strong point through the first four weeks of the season.Arizona is currently second in the league in rushing defense, allowing 75 yards per game, and has yet to allow a 100-yard performance to any one person in 2013.“We’re just challenging each other,” said Dansby. “We’re challenging each other here in the locker room to be solid and stout against the run, to be accountable, to stand up, do your job and do it well. If we continue to hold each other accountable, we can put performances like [the previous four games] together.”center_img TEMPE, Ariz. — The Carolina Panthers come to town Sunday afternoon with a rather one-dimensional offensive attack. It just so happens, though, that their one dimension — the run game — has been dominant so far this season.Through the first four weeks of 2013, the Panthers have the third-highest rushing average (151.0 yards/game) in the NFL, and running back DeAngelo Williams trails only LeSean McCoy and Adrian Peterson in the same individual category (97.0 rushing yards/game). The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Defensive coordinator Todd Bowles said Thursday that when game planning against Newton and Co. it’s almost a matter of picking your poison.The only problem with that, however, is that Carolina often disguises its various poisons by running the read option.Last season, the Panthers ran a league-high 81 plays out of the read option, and according to STATS, they are on pace to shatter that total this season.So how do you limit a multifaceted ground game?“Any run game, the way to stop it is great penetration,” Cardinals defensive end Calais Campbell said. “Really you have to make them stop and start their feet a bunch. If you get to a running back’s feet and make them change direction, it’s harder for them to continue to make plays.”What if one of those talented backs also moonlights as a 245-pound quarterback who can beat you with his arm (threw for over 400 yards during his last trip to Glendale) and his legs (23 rushing touchdowns in 35 career games) out of the read option?“It’s tough,” said Campbell. “Every team that does the read option is tough. You almost have to put eight men in the box, but that’s when they start using that read option pass to eat you up a little bit. The biggest thing is being disciplined, somebody has the back and somebody has the quarterback. As long as you know who has who, you should be fine.” Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more