Is there an identity crisis for France?

first_imgPatrice Lagisquet, the third member of France’s coaching triumvirate, told Midi Olympique on Monday that they have five fly-halves to choose from: Camille Lopez, Remi Tales, Trinh-Duc, Michalak and Jules Plisson.Turned a corner: Remi TalesOnly two of those five – Lopez and Tales – are in the squad for the November Tests though Lagisquet stressed all will be in contention come the Six Nations. The pair have four caps between them and just two starts – both on the summer tour to New Zealand – but their inexperience is balanced by their intelligence.Lopez, at 24 five years younger than Tales, moved to Perpignan from Bordeaux in the summer and is prospering at his new club. He’s made no secret of the fact he’s modelled himself on Jonny Wilkinson – though Lopez has more natural attacking instincts than his idol – and his composure was evident when he made an accomplished debut against the All Blacks in June. He’s also prospering from playing in a backline containing James Hook, though ironically the presence of the Welshman may have diminished Lopez’s status in the eyes of Saint-Andre. Lopez was the goal-kicker at Bordeaux, kicking 232 points last season, but at Perpignan that role belongs to Hook. Tales, on the other hand, has never been much of a goal-kicker. What he is, however, is an authoritative fly-half, not that common among French tens, a player who, as he showed in his masterly display against Biarritz at the weekend, can create chaos for opponents with his crafty skills. “Anglo-Saxon in outlook”: French newspaper Midi Olympique has said French rugby has lost its identity. Is it true?By Gavin MortimerThe editorial in Monday’s edition of Midi Olympique pulled no punches. The national team is beset by a “gloomy lassitude”, declared the paper, brought on by a year in which Les Bleus have won just one of their eight Tests, a 23-16 victory against Scotland on the final weekend of the Six Nations. Not that it did France much good: they still finished bottom of the table, their first Wooden Spoon in 14 years.That sorry roll call of results could of course change in the next month, if France were to beat New Zealand, Tonga and South Africa on consecutive weekends. Then again, if the French don’t show a vast improvement on the form they displayed on their disastrous summer tour to New Zealand, where they were whitewashed in the three-Test series, they could end up losing all three. Don’t forget Tonga beat France 19-14 in their pool A clash in the 2011 World Cup.What troubles Midi Olympique isn’t so much the results, grim as they are, more what they describe as “the loss of identity of our rugby”. Zut! How could a nation that gave the world such greats as Gachassin, Boniface, Blanco, Sella and Castaignede be transformed into a side so…well, so Anglo-Saxon in outlook. “From where comes this last decade without brio, based solely on defence and the set-piece?” wails Midi Olympique.Pressured to turn things around: Philippe Saint AndreIt was a question put recently to the erudite Yannick Bru, the former Toulouse hooker and now the forwards coach of the national team, during a coaching clinic at the Toulouse Academy. Initially, Bru trotted out the usual excuse, the lack of time the French squad have together compared to other nations. But then he went off-message, so to speak, declaring that the French squad are deficient in technical skills. “Look at the All Blacks’ restarts,” said Bru, citing an example. “The balls always fall in the exact spot where they want them to…it’s never true for us. No fly-half in France is capable of landing the ball on such and such a point.”Ah, fly-half, the position Midi Olympique calls the “eternal problem” facing France in the last dozen years. Not since wee Thomas Castaignede made the position his own for a couple of glorious years in the late 1990s have France produced a ten capable of world-class consistency. Frederic Michalak has had his moments, Francois-Trinh-Duc too, and it was even rumoured David Skrela once produced a decent 80 minutes of rugby. But oh how the French XV have cried out for a Carter, a Larkham, a Wilkinson, an O’Gara. France’s Rugby Union national team scrum half Remi Tales passes the ball during a training session on September 25, 2013 in Marcoussis, outside Paris, as part of the preparation for the November test matches, which will be played against New Zealand, Tonga Island and South Africa. AFP PHOTO / FRANCK FIFE (Photo credit should read FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images) In addition Tales is no liability in defence. He’s a meaty six-footer, a man who knows how to tackle, and he looks likely to start against New Zealand on Saturday week, certainly if Lagisquet has his way. Acknowledging that the 29-year-old Tales has been a late developer, he said: “In just a few months he’s become champion of France [with Castres], an international and club captain. You can see in his development that he’s turned a corner.”He’s turned a corner, but can Tales turn France into the side we all used to love watching? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

World Cup 2015: England 25-28 Wales

first_img Dan Biggar slotted a long-range penalty in the 73rd minute to hand Wales a dramatic win over England in an incredible World Cup match at Twickenham. England had dominated the first half, Jonny May crossing, but their ill-discipline in the second period allowed Wales to erode their lead. Then Gareth Davies crossed for a try that levelled the scores before Biggar put them in front. England had a penalty of their own in the last few minutes but opted for the corner and could not cross the whitewash. Simply an epic match.WHAT’S HOTIntensity – From the noise of the crowd, the passion of the players and the physicality of the contest, this was a match to give you goosebumps. Emotions boiled over on occasion, Dan Biggar and Mike Brown among those to vent their feelings whilst also showing their class, but there was never any doubt as to how much was at stake during this match. Let’s hope for more of the same throughout this World Cup.Round trip: Jonny May runs in England’s only try. Photo: Getty ImagesFancy feet – Round of applause to Mike Brown for controlling the ball with his feet in the build-up to Jonny May’s try. Not sure his beloved Manchester United will be on the phone offering him a contract, but if he’d tried to pick up the ball he would most likely have knocked on and the chance would have disappeared. And Lloyd Williams deserves mention too. Playing out of position on the wing, he put through a lovely kick for Gareth Davies to score under the posts. Dan Biggar and Owen Farrell were both immaculate from the tee too.Jerome Garces – The French referee impressed with his officiating of South Africa v Japan last weekend and took a similar approach here. He lets the game flow and allows teams to build momentum, only blowing when necessarily. He’s firm in his calls but there’s little of the stop-start nature we’ve seen in many games so far at RWC 2015. This comment to Sam Warburton also raised a smile: “Two and ten (Scott Baldwin and Dan Biggar) talk too much”! On target: Dan Biggar slots the winning penalty against Wales. Photo: Getty Images Crossing point: Gareth Davies scores under the posts for Wales. Photo: Getty ImagesWHAT’S NOTInjuries – Could it get any worse for Wales? Even before the tournament started they had Jonathan Davies, Leigh Halfpenny and Rhys Webb ruled out, and now they can’t seem to go through a game without picking up more injuries – the Williamses Scott and Liam both leaving the field on a stretcher here, and Halam Amos hurting his arm.Pre-match build-up – These so-called insightful interviews held inside the stadiums before kick-off by presenters whose rugby knowledge is patently lacking can get on the nerves. There’s no need to force an atmosphere at a game of this magnitude – the capacity crowd are perfectly capable of generating that on their own.Wales’ set-piece – The Welsh scrum was under pressure from the off and they conceded three penalties from that facet of play early on, meaning they conceded either territory or points. The lineout was flaky too, whether the officials ruled it not straight or England stole it. Overall, the set-piece combined to put pressure on Wales and will need to improve as they move through the tournament.Hard going: Wales conceded several penalties to England at scrum time. Photo: Getty ImagesSTATISTICS LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 32 – The number of missed tackles in the match, 17 by England and 15 by Wales.23 – The number of penalties in the match, 12 conceded by England and 11 by Wales, including four at the scrum.84 – The number of metres made by Billy Vunipola, more than any other player.England: M Brown; A Watson, B Barritt, S Burgess (G Ford 70), J May; O Farrell, B Youngs (R Wigglesworth 49); J Marler (M Vunipola 61), T Youngs (R Webber 67), D Cole (K Brookes 72), G Parling, C Lawes (J Launchbury ht), T Wood, C Robshaw (capt), B Vunipola (J Haskell 63).Try: May. Con: Farrell. Pens: Farrell 4. DG: Farrell.Wales: Liam Williams (R Priestland 67); G North, S Williams (A Cuthbert 63), J Roberts, H Amos (Lloyd Williams 67); D Biggar, G Davies; G Jenkins, S Baldwin (K Owens 49), T Francis (S Lee 49), B Davies (L Charteris 70), AW Jones, D Lydiate (J Tipuric 70), S Warburton (capt), T Faletau.Try: G Davies. Con: Biggar. Pens: Biggar 7.Man of the Match: Dan Biggarcenter_img TAGS: Highlight A full review of Wales’ dramatic victory over England at Twickenham Attendance: 81,129For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Jacob Stockdale on running, religion and rugby memories

first_img Jacob Stockdale on running, religion and rugby memoriesJacob Stockdale recently bought a Mustang on eBay. It’s navy blue with white stripes down the centre. Cars are a big love of his and the plan is to make use of his days off by doing this one up, learning about engines as he goes.If Stockdale were a car, it would no doubt have ‘go-faster’ stripes. He’s not one to hang about. A couple of years into his international career, he is only one try away from becoming one of Ireland’s top ten try-scorers of all time having already crossed for 16 in 21 Tests.He’s not one to rest on his laurels either and is working on fine-tuning himself as well as his Mustang. “Defence is a big improvement for me,” replies Stockdale when asked about the areas he’s made most strides in since his 2017 Test debut.“It’s something that was seen as a bit of a weakness before but I’ve worked really hard on that in the last couple of seasons – and I’m not finished yet. My high-ball work in the air is coming along, too, and is something I want to turn into a strength, to dominate in the air and go after balls. If you can catch cross-kicks, it can be a 30-40m gain for the team.”Having had a few hamstring problems during his career, the 23-year-old is also working with Ireland’s strength and conditioning coaches to change his running style and put less strain on the muscles. It’s a tough task when your body is so used to moving a certain way.“It’s easy when you’re thinking about it and running in a straight line, but when you have a rugby ball in your hands and are trying to focus on beating a defender it’s a bit trickier,” he says. “I’m seeing improvements in how I run and if you compare the last season to the three seasons before it looks better. It’s trying to get my running style more effective and natural, and hopefully faster.”Watch Stockdale break down the wing for Ulster or Ireland and you wouldn’t think there was much wrong with his running ability, but small changes can make a big difference. When he first joined the Ulster Academy, he had a few injuries and used the time on the sidelines to get bigger and stronger.Yet while he could lift huge amounts in the gym, he’d lost his top-end speed and couldn’t change direction easily. Now he’s found his optimum “fighting weight” to combine power and pace.Had he not had a growth spurt at 16, however, Stockdale would probably be playing rugby as a hobby while working in the criminology field. As it happened, growing nine inches in a year enhanced his rugby ability and the degree he started fell by the wayside when rugby commitments took over.“At 16 I was 5ft 6in. Then when I came back from the summer holidays I was 6ft and then I kept growing until I was 6ft 3in. I was pretty useless at rugby before but with the growth in height I got bigger and stronger and faster, and I found I was able to break tackles. I felt a lot more confident too.“I would always have played rugby because I love the sport, but I wouldn’t be half as good a player.”Kicking on: Jacob Stockdale has worked on his kicking game (Getty Images)With the possibility of two months in Japan should Ireland make history in reaching the World Cup semi-finals for the first time, it is an intense time for rugby’s top players. Yet Stockdale has always been one to find ways to switch off, valuing the importance of balance.When he first started out, he had his criminology degree. He also plays the guitar, although Tracy Chapman’s Fast Car is the only song he’d be confident enough to perform in public; instead he tries to strum Eric Clapton tunes at home.He’s also involved in the Peace IV project at Lurgan RFC, whose U20 side were Rugby World’s January Team of the Month. He visits local schools to encourage children to get involved in the summer course and lends a hand with coaching when he can. He sees Peace IV as a way of helping Northern Ireland move forward and says: “It’s a cross-community project that brings the two sides – nationalists and unionists – together. We go into schools and try to get them talking through rugby. A lot of kids have never played rugby in their lives, so they come along, learn and play a tournament at the end of it. The Ireland wing provides an insight into his life on and off the field Ready for action: Jacob Stockdale poses for a World Cup portrait (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img This article originally appeared in the September 2019 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. “I’m a very strong believer in Northern Ireland moving forward and the best way to do that is through the younger generations, the generations coming after me. The two sides of the community can be friends and talk and move on from the past. It’s small steps but hopefully it makes a difference.”Religion also plays a big part in his life. His belief that his future is out of his hands means he doesn’t dwell for too long on defeats. Yes, he’s disappointed but he’ll grasp the intended lessons.Take Ulster’s European Champions Cup quarter-final defeat by Leinster, when Stockdale burst past a handful of defenders only to drop the ball over the line. “Don’t get me wrong; I was really upset about it and felt sorry for myself for a day or two, but then I moved on,” he says. “He (God) wanted me to learn from it and I did learn a lesson.“The big thing I’ve learnt is your curve is not always going to rise, it will have dips and tough times, and the more tough times I have the more I learn to deal with them. It’s nice not to worry about the future. I work as hard as I can to be the best player I can, but if it’s not God’s plan, it’s not happening.Try time: Jacob Stockdale scores against Wales (Getty Images)“Praying can help me in the middle of a game – the last time was probably in that quarter-final! I remember the first time I played at the Aviva (Stadium) and scored a try, I looked up to say, ‘Thanks for that’. The camera caught me and I had a weird expression on my face!”Of course, talk of religion and rugby leads to Israel Folau. What does Stockdale make of the full-back’s sacking by Rugby Australia after his anti-gay social media posts and Folau’s claim it is religious discrimination?“It’s a very difficult situation – it’s never going to be black and white. On the one hand, I support Israel Folau’s right to religion and right to freedom of speech. On the other hand, he’s representing Australia and the Waratahs, and he has a large amount of responsibility not to offend supporters. If it was me, I’d want people to feel comfortable coming to watch me play rugby.”While Folau isn’t in Japan for RWC 2019, Stockdale is front and centre of Ireland’s campaign. Ask him about his World Cup memories and he mentions New Zealand’s loss to France in 2007 and Bernard Foley’s try against England in 2015 that knocked out the hosts, but it is the 2011 tournament that stands out most. He describes himself as “obsessed”, rising in the early hours to watch all 48 matches taking place in New Zealand.So what of this World Cup? Can Ireland break into the last four for the first time? “The Ireland team has made history before and there’s no reason we can’t now. I feel pretty confident.”Ireland must start well, with Scotland first up before further pool matches against Japan, Russia and Samoa. If, as expected, they make it out of the group, they will surely face New Zealand or South Africa in the last eight. Stockdale is aware of the size of the challenge, but there are big motivators.“Scotland are a very good team and probably haven’t had the success in the last couple of years they deserved. It’s a nice way to start the tournament, you’re not feeling your way in. If we beat them it stands us in good stead to top the group.“Joe’s leaving and Rory Best is retiring after the World Cup, there are probably a couple of other guys who won’t go to another World Cup, so it’s massive. We want to perform to our potential.”Stockdale has done that since breaking into the Irish team. He exceeded his own expectations by nailing down a starting spot so quickly. Like his Mustang, he covers ground quickly.last_img read more

Six Nations Team of the Weekend: Round Four

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 9. Ben Youngs (England)On the break: Youngs excelled at Twickenham against Wales (Getty Images)A performance that showed he can still perform at the highest level. He has received a lot of criticism in the past but on Saturday his box-kicking was accurate as was his passing. He proved a menace around the breakdown too.10. Dan Biggar (Wales) Six Nations Team of the Weekend: Round FourRound Four of the Six Nations has been and gone and it was peculiar to say the least. In the men’s tournament Ireland’s contest with Italy was postponed as was the same fixture in the women’s tournament. Scotland’s match against France was also postponed in the women’s event.Bearing that in mind who do you think made it into Sam Tremlett’s team of the weekend and what do you think of his selections?1. Rory Sutherland (Scotland)Charged: Sutherland attempts to charge down Anthony Bouthier’s kick (Getty Images)Sutherland continued his good form in Round Four as he played a huge part in the success of the scrum against the French. He was also effective in defence.2. Jamie George (England)Fronting Up: George gets ready for contact (Getty Images)Excellent accuracy at the line out and industrious around the pitch as ever.3. Zander Fagerson (Scotland)Fingertips: Fagerson just manages to haul down Antoine Dupont (Getty Images)Like Sutherland above, Fagerson also played a key role in the, at times, dominant Scottish scrum.4. Maro Itoje (England)Incredible Form: Itoje continues to excel in the England pack (Getty Images)Once again it was impossible to overlook Itoje who was at it rampaging, disruptive, excellent best in Round Four.5. Poppy Cleall (England Women) George Ford dictated things nicely for England but Biggar did everything at a high-level despite the lack of good front-foot ball he was given.11. Anthony Watson (England) Watson revealed his excellent footwork to score a nice move in the opening five minutes against Wales. He largely looked as if he had never been away.12. Owen Farrell (England)Slotting Home: Farrell kicked well with the boot (Getty Images)A couple of moments of ill-discipline but Farrell plays with such emotion and physicality this is to be expected. Led the side to victory well and was polished with the boot.13. Manu Tuilagi (England)Destructive: Tuilagi was excellent until his red card moment (Getty Images)Yes he got sent-off and rightly so, but it had little bearing on the overall result as Tuilagi had done all his damage earlier on in the match. The influence he has on England’s attack cannot be overstated.14. Sean Maitland (Scotland) The penultimate week of Six Nations rugby is done and dusted. Now check out Sam Tremlett’s team of the weekend for Round Four 8. Tom Curry (England)Big Hitter: Curry loves the contact (Getty Images)Curry has been a relentless ball of energy in the 2020 tournament and that continued on Saturday. A tackling machine (he made 21) and a player who goes into contact with such speed and ferocity. Expand Six Nations Table 2021 Collapse 2021 Six Nations Injuries Update 2021 Six Nations Injuries Update Expandcenter_img Six Nations Table 2021 Mark Wilson was once again ridiculously good making over 20 tackles but we have gone for Tipuric because of his two tries, one of which is a strong candidate for try of the tournament as you can see above. Leadership: Hogg guided the team to victory (Getty Images)His best performance of the tournament so far, Hogg played key roles in both of Maitland’s tries and was excellent with the boot and under the high-ball.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Grant Gilchrist and George Kruis both performed well over the weekend but Cleall was a monster against Wales scoring a hat-trick of tries.6. Jamie Ritchie (Scotland)Antagonistic: Ritchie got under the frustrated skin of the French (Getty Images)Ritchie may not be the biggest flanker on the planet but he is one of the best at getting under the opponents skin and disrupting attacking ball. He showed this well against France as he ultimately caused Mohamed Haouas to lose his cool.7. Justin Tipuric (Wales) What Trophies Do You Get For Winning A Grand Slam? Who is leading the way in the Six… Round Four: Hogg is one of 15 in the team of the weekend. Who else makes it? (Getty Images) What Trophies Do You Get For Winning A Grand Slam? Wales won a Grand Slam last year, but… Two expertly taken tries means Maitland makes the team of the weekend for the first time in 2020.15. Stuart Hogg (Scotland) All the latest news on players injured throughout…last_img read more

Ulster v Munster live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ulster v Munster live stream: How to watch the Pro14 match online from anywhereThese two provinces start 2021 at the top of their respective Guinness Pro14 conferences unbeaten so far this season.Ulster have won all nine of their matches in Conference A while it’s seven victories out of seven for Munster in Conference B, so which team’s winning streak will come to an end today? Or will we see the first draw of the 2020-21 Pro14 season?It’s a year since these two sides last played, Ulster comfortable 38-17 winners at the Kingspan last January. Watch the highlights of that match here and we have the team news for today’s fixture (kick-off 5.15pm) below.Ulster: Jacob Stockdale; Matt Faddes, James Hume, Stuart McCloskey, Ethan McIlroy; Billy Burns, John Cooney; Eric O’Sullivan, Rob Herring, Marty Moore, Kieran Treadwell, Sam Carter (captain), Matty Rea, David McCann, Nick Timoney.Replacements: Adam McBurney, Callum Reid, Tom O’Toole, David O’Connor, Marcell Coetzee, Nathan Doak, Ian Madigan, Ben Moxham.Munster: Shane Daly; Calvin Nash, Dan Goggin, Rory Scannell, Liam Coombes; Ben Healy, Craig Casey; Liam O’Connor, Niall Scannell, John Ryan, Fineen Wycherley, Billy Holland (captain), Jack O’Donoghue, Chris Cloete, Jack O’Sullivan.Replacements: Rhys Marshall, Dave Kilcoyne, Roman Salanoa, Thomas Ahern, Tommy O’Donnell, Nick McCarthy, Jack Crowley, Darren Sweetnam.Here’s how to find a reliable live stream for Ulster v Munster wherever you are.Ulster v Munster live stream: How to watch from the UKUlster v Munster, which kicks off at 5.15pm today, will be shown live on Premier Sports 2 in the UK.Premier Sports show every Guinness Pro14 match live in the UK. If you have a Sky or Virgin Media contract, you can add Premier Sports to your package from £9.99 a month.Or subscribe to Premier Player so you can stream matches online from £9.99 a month or £99 for 12 months.See Premier Sports offersIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when there’s a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – Virtual Private Network. Check out Express VPN. Team news and TV details for today’s interprovincial match in Belfast Ulster v Munster live stream: How to watch from South AfricaUlster v Munster kicks off at 7.15pm South African time and is live on SuperSport’s CSN, Rugby and Grandstand channels.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Flashback: Ulster and Munster last played in January 2020 (Getty Images) Ulster v Munster live stream: How to watch from IrelandIn Ireland, eir Sport show Pro14 matches live, including Ulster v Munster (kick-off 5.15pm eir Sport 1), and if you sign up for eir broadband you can watch eir Sport for free via the eir TV app and online player.Find out more about the eir broadband deals here.Or you can sign up for eir TV and broadband packages, which include eir Sport, from €39.98 a month.If you have Sky TV in Ireland but not eir broadband, you can add eir Sport to your package for €19.99 a month for three months (€29.99 after that) or for €240 for the year – here are the details of the Sky-eir package.If you’re from Ireland but are abroad when there’s a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN.Ulster v Munster live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to Ulster v Munster from New Zealand, the match kicks off at 6.15am on Sunday morning on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Six Nations postponements through the years

first_img France’s game against Ireland in 2012 was postponed just minutes before kick off (Getty Images) 1985 Bad weather sweeping across Western Europe caused three fixtures postponements in 1985. Postponements meant Ireland faced England and France faced Wales in late March instead, while Wales waited until April to play England after a frozen Cardiff pitch postponed their fixture.1987 England v Scotland and Wales v Ireland were both postponed on January 17 due to poor travelling conditions. The pitches in London and Cardiff were both deemed perfectly playable, but the decision was made to postpone the fixtures until April after it was determined too dangerous for Scottish, Irish and northern English fans to travel for the games.2001The outbreak of Foot & Mouth disease at the start of the millennium caused Ireland to postpone all three of their fixtures against the other home nations, amid concerns for their population and livestock. First detected in February, Ireland had already played France and Italy before the outbreak. Postponing the three fixtures until September and October allowed Ireland to scupper England’s hopes of a Grand Slam after winning 20-14, although they still won the championship. 2012 Just ten minutes before kick-off, officials deemed France’s pitch for their second round game against Ireland unplayable, moving the fixture from 11 February to 4 March with the temperature well below freezing, at -5. Not since the 1980s had bad weather postponed a game.2020 All it took to halt an entire round of Six Nations fixtures was a global pandemic, as Covid-19 caused four postponements in the championship. The championship was still undecided as Italy’s penultimate match against Ireland, and all three of the final round fixtures, moved from March until October. England eventually emerged victorious after dispatching Italy in Rome, although they were unable to lift the trophy in front of fans as the virus continues to spread. Six Nations postponements are not that much of a common occurrence. However, from time to time they still happen. Over the Five Nations into the Six Nations years, there have been a number of different reasons for postponed games, or in some cases, complete cancellations.Covid-19 is perhaps the most high-profile recent reason for fixture cancellations at the championship, but here are some other instances where teams had to play at a later date below.Five and Six Nations postponements1914The first postponed fixture in the championship was Scotland v France. A riot the year before in Paris caused relations between the two nations’ unions to fracture, cancelling their 1914 encounter as a result. Consequently, the teams refused to play each other in Scotland, despite the championship proceeding as normal.1952England were due to play Ireland at the beginning of February, but King George VI’s death days before the intended fixture postponed the game until late March due to King George VI’s passing days before the intended fixture. 1962A smallpox epidemic breaking out in South Wales caused the postponement of Ireland’s home fixture against Wales, moving from March until November later that year.1972At the height of ‘The Troubles’, the IRA threatened to bomb Ireland’s match against Scotland, which was due to take place just days after Bloody Sunday. Instead, officials left the championship incomplete after cancelling Ireland’s home fixtures against Scotland and Wales.1982 Heavy snow at Landsdowne Road postponed Ireland’s game against Wales, although play resumed just a week later due to a free week for teams. Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Or, subscribe to the print edition for delivery of the magazine to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A global pandemic, riots and frozen pitches have all caused games to be postponedlast_img read more

How to score a wonder try: The rugby league skill flying into union

first_img How to score a wonder try: The rugby league skill flying into unionAs breathtaking as the finish was, for days later rugby union fans were found debating the merits of England wing Jonny May’s acrobatic try against Italy in the Six Nations. Was it legal? Was it safe? Should it have stood?For some, the whole conversation became bewildering.“Look at the whole premise of sport,” reflects Rob Vickerman, a fortnight after that try. “The Olympic motto is ‘faster, higher, stronger’. We want to be pushing boundaries and seeing exceptional things. I just don’t get excited about a pick and go.“If you’re going to look at this acrobatics-style finish on the edge of the line, I’m all for it. It’s got to be safe, which is why the discussions around jumping have to be legitimate, and that is understandable. But show me a more memorable moment from this year’s Six Nations – some contestable decisions aside – than that flying dive. It’s such an iconic moment. Why would you not celebrate that in a time where the game needs to grow?”It is an interesting point the player-turned-commentator raises. Then again, for anyone who has listened to Rob, there is something else undeniable: he is northern. Raised in the land of rugby league, he has also grown accustomed to seeing certain sporting trends.Jonny May’s sensational – and controversial – try (Getty Images)Yes, highlight reels of NFL running backs and receivers hurdling tacklers and diving over a thickly-muscled scrimmage catch the eye, but such moves would be seen as unquestionably reckless in rugby. There are better examples much closer to home, where stars of Super League have been springing into finishes like May’s for some time.“You most definitely need a finish like that in your arsenal now,” says St Helens and England wing Tommy Makinson. “From the international game to those big league games, there’s not much separating the two. If you can add it to your game and do a finish like that, when it’s needed, it adds an extra string to your bow. So it’s definitely needed.“Your main purpose as a try-scorer is to get that ball over the line, so if you have to ride a tackle or jump (spinning towards touch) to get that ball down, I don’t believe the people who say it’s a bad thing. If you can get that ball down any way possible, it can be more exciting for fans when it goes on the big screen or the ref gives it straight away.“It’s a massively different skill (to a normal diving finish) – you are putting your body into a position it would never normally be in, in a game. At the corner you’re trying to get everything over the sidelines, bar the ball. So you’re going for that corner while keeping your feet and body in play, then as soon as you take off the rest of your body is irrelevant: it’s about your hands.”Makinson plays on the right wing. Over at Wakefield, fellow flying finisher Tom Johnstone occupies the left wing. Is his view from up in the air any different?“All I think about is trying to get the body as high as it can, but getting the ball as low as I can,” Johnstone says of his in-game thought process. “First thing I want to do is get that ball down in the corner, but keep myself high enough so that if people hit me, they’re not going to get me out.“I’ll get to that corner and then jump, and depending on how many (defenders there) are or how fast they’re coming across will dictate how early I jump. Sometimes I don’t have to jump too much. Sometimes, I try to do it from three or four yards away to try to project (myself) a bit. But it feels good!“I try not to think too much. You can start overthinking it and panicking. You can get the ball in the wrong hand or some people jump and put the ball up, thinking the ball needs to be up in the air, but it doesn’t. Otherwise, you’re giving the defenders more time to get to it.“For the first few seconds when you hit and you flip and you’re not quite sure where you’re gonna land, that’s pretty funny. But I don’t really think much of it other than, ‘I need to get this ball down’. Everyone else has their job, but mine is to finish. So I need to make sure I don’t miss it.”It’s something Makinson can relate back to May’s Six Nations score.He says: “The skill in that try was sensational and no matter what the debate is, you can’t take away from that skill-set. In our position nowadays, the wing, whether in the NRL or for the RFU or in rugby league, it’s one you need.“In the heat of the moment, in those tight situations, where the game depends on a try, coming up with a piece of skill like that is massive. In our sport, we’re accustomed to practising that, making sure we nail our opportunities. In the last six or seven years in league, this (skill) has really taken off and that finish is almost the norm. It’s expected in those tight situations, when you get the chance.”Makinson scores for St Helens in a tight spot (Getty Images)Makinson laughs that he has gotten it wrong plenty of times, in training and in games. The key is backing yourself to not just try it, but keep learning. It won’t always work. Johnstone explains that it can hurt, pursuing that diving finish. Once, a few years back, a defender flew in as he was diving and the shoulder contact fractured Johnstone’s fibula. Tommy Makinson of England Rugby League scores a try in the corner (Getty Images) TAGS: Highlight At this point you can feel the need for World Rugby clarity on the legalities of would-be scorers diving towards the try-line at the same time as spinning, mid-air, away from the field of play. However, there is no denying the skill can wow a crowd. When the finisher has the technique down.Keeping a keen eye on other masters helps. A few years younger than his fellow finisher, Johnstone namechecks Makinson as someone he spotted honing the skill while he was growing up. He also singles out Sale Sharks speedster Denny Solomona as “the best one at it”, encouraging any winger keen to perfect the skill to seek out former league star Solomona, or at least to study him.As Johnstone explains: “Denny did it to me a few times, and I thought ‘Right, this seems to be the go! This is what I need to start doing.’ So I just started practising.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img We talk to Super League stars about the art of acrobatic tries So how would these finishers approach learning the craft?After May’s try against Italy, an image reemerged of the wing working on diving into the corner with crash mats and pads, in England training back in 2015. Debate could be held about the merits of a constant-play approach and training in as many game-like situations as possible, versus the well-defined construct of a drill. For the Super League stars, the answer likely shuttles between the two.Johnstone begins sharing his experiences, saying: “I’d tried it a couple of times and it was just trial and error. Getting bundled out or going too high or not going high enough, so people could get hold of your legs. Or keeping the ball away and putting it in the wrong hands and things like that.“I did it once and I enjoyed it – it felt pretty good, and it worked. Then one of my coaches set up a corner mat. He used to tell me to just aim for the corner, get up, and he would try to whack me with a shield or something, to try to dislodge the ball. It made me work on my grip a lot, because a lot of people will try to push you or whack your arms. So if you can, make sure your grip’s perfect.”Gaining confidence will be important. Then Makinson explains the need to build from here.May dives for the line in England training, 2015 (Getty Images)The St Helens star adds: “You can get used to doing it with no pressure, so knowing where the sideline is, where to put your feet, where you should put your hands, where your eyes are (looking), and transferring the ball from one hand to the opposite, with no pressure. The next step is to do that with pressure. You will come along nicely, but as soon as you add that extra defender or the cover tackle, that’s when it gets difficult.“It’s hard to set up a drill, saying, ‘I’m going to score here, you give me four yards and you set up as cover tackle here’. But I just think putting it into more and more game-like situations in training (is good) and obviously we learn on the field, playing the game. It’s about learning on the go.“It’s the same with the best players in any sport. You learn by constantly doing it. If you get an opportunity it’s nice to nail it in training and then taking it into the game – that’s not to say you won’t stuff it up, because I’ve stuffed many up in training and in the game! But it’s about taking the opportunity and as a winger that’s all I want: the more space the better, but if you have a few yards, a tight corner, you want to get your body in there and get the ball down. The opportunity is all you want as outside players.”Both men know the joy of scoring these tries. Johnstone jokes that he has been guilty of going for finishes like these when the situation doesn’t even demand acrobatics. But in the end, they believe it should be about the joy of the spectators too.It’s up to union to decide how they want to react, the next time a try-scorer takes to the skies. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Oklahoma: A global outpouring of support, and a long road…

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By Pat McCaughanPosted May 22, 2013 Rector Shreveport, LA Malcolm J Blue says: May 22, 2013 at 4:51 pm I just researched and read that the 2 Senators from Oklahoma voted NO on sending aid to areas in NY & NJ which suffered greater damage from hurricane Sandy than NOLA from Katrina. I spent a great deal of time in Queens, NY – the area where the greatest damage occurred, so I sent another donation to NYC agencies and nothing to OK. I thought we were …”on nation under God with liberty and justice for all.” ? Populace overall thinks so, but NOT the politicians! Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN May 22, 2013 at 6:10 pm I agree. The Republicans in Oklahoma can support themselves. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY May 23, 2013 at 12:43 pm Where charity and love are found, God is as well… John R Huff Jr says: A woman walks through debris after a huge tornado struck Moore, Oklahoma, near Oklahoma City, May 20, 2013. A massive tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, killing at least 24 people as winds of up to 200 miles per hour (320 kph) flattened entire tracts of homes, two schools and a hospital, leaving a wake of tangled wreckage. Photo: Reuters/Richard Rowe[Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians and others from across the globe reached out May 21 in prayer and support for Oklahomans, still reeling from a massive tornado that had injured hundreds and killed dozens of people, including 9 children, the day before.“This is the first full day since the tornado and a lot is still evolving, information is still developing. The key is to make sure we can do what we need to do and provide support and resources to those who need them,” said the Rev. Canon José McLoughlin, canon to the ordinary for the Episcopal Diocese of Oklahoma, who forgot it was his birthday until someone reminded him.“Imagine someone living in a neighborhood, a community, and all that gone, and seeing nothing but slabs where a neighborhood, and homes were, and where kids played,” he said during a May 21 evening telephone interview with ENS.“It was hard to really focus or think about it being a birthday with so much going on and people in need, and figuring out all the things that need to be done.”He had spent much of the day between two extremes: grappling with the sheer immensity of the destruction and a staggering outpouring of love and offers of support from around the world.“It’s been remarkable. For the last 24 hours, especially, it’s been overwhelming, the amount of communication we’ve received from people ready to do whatever whenever” via e-mails, text messages and phone calls.“The church has been amazing, from the presiding bishop reaching out to Bishop Ed Konieczny and the people at ERD (Episcopal Relief & Development), to parish priests — it’s just been amazing, the genuine outpouring of concern and genuine offers to help.”[Episcopal Relief & Development has posted a page of resources for tornado relief here.]McLoughlin said he and other diocesan staff had received expressions of concern from as far away as “Japan and Germany and Dubai … (and from) folks throughout the Anglican Communion” and from all levels of the church.“It’s incredible the way they’ve reached out to us. Clergy across the country have reached out to ask what they can do, have said they’re holding us in prayer.Right now, the diocese is still very much in assessment and short-term recovery response mode, he added.“We’ve been cataloging every person who’s called in, what they’re offering, what they can do, just as we’re cataloging needs from parishes and priests to make sure we can be prepared as the days go on, because the real challenge is going to come when the media leaves and the work continues, and to make sure who’s available to help us,” he said.As stories of heroism and service emerged, he celebrated the resiliency of Oklahomans, many of whom are beginning to shift from shock and rescue to recovery and helping one another.Local clergy were still attempting to contact parishioners and to account for the status of all their members. The diocese offered immediate assistance to those in need of lodging, food, clothing, personal items and other essentials, he said.The American Red Cross and other first responders were still keeping people away from some areas, “so I suspect in the coming days, once they’re no longer doing any recovery and when the clean-up starts, we’ll be securing people to help in clean-up efforts,” he said.St. Mary’s School in Edmond had begun coordinated efforts to collect water and other comfort items such as toys and stuffed animals, but local agencies have said the immediate need is for financial assistance, the Rev. Bob Story, rector of St. Mary’s Church, said May 21.“We’ve contacted two different agencies, the regional food bank and they’re telling us they need money,” said Story, who knew of two families displaced by the tornado. “They don’t have a need for other things right now; it creates a storage problem.”And, while many people want “to do more than just write a check” at the present time, “the regional food bank in Oklahoma City is so well-coordinated now that they have a very precise knowledge of what they need and in order to fulfill that need, they just need money because it gives them the most flexibility,” he said.The church had held an 8:30 p.m. prayer vigil the previous evening, “to express our grief over all the children who were killed,” he said. “We sent out an e-mail to the parish and about 15 people showed up spontaneously.”Other vigils, including a 7 p.m. music and worship service “open to everybody” at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City, were planned for May 22.Elsewhere, St. Paul’s Church, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, also announced a 5:30 p.m. prayer vigil this evening.“As people of faith, we can do a number of things, the most important of which are to offer our prayers to God and to support those agencies giving disaster relief,” according to a statement the church released.“All donations will be directed to Episcopal Relief & Development for their work on our behalf to support the victims,” according to the statement.Ironically, McLoughlin was headed to the airport the day the so-called “monster” tornado hit (May 20), to attend an Episcopal Relief & Development disaster preparedness training session planned in St. Louis.Thinking about the May 19 storms and tornadoes that damaged some suburban Oklahoma City areas, and hearing radio weather reports, “I got a sense of what was happening,” he recalled.“Something just didn’t seem right. I got to the airport and I never got out of my car,” he said. “I came back to the office and never left, and then the tornado struck.”Last night, at the end of a very long day spent responding to such immediate challenges as property and other assessment, insurance assistance, cataloging resources and offers and creating a financial infrastructure to receive donations, McLoughlin shifted his focus.“I spent the evening with my family” as he turned 44, he said. “The irony is, I’m sitting here at my house (in Edmond) and it’s a beautiful sunny evening, knowing that in just a matter of 40 minutes drive, how much damage was done, so much devastation,” he said.“For some people, for a lot of people, the sun hasn’t started shining yet. It feels very raw.”Once the media spotlight is gone, he hopes support and assistance will continue for what promises to be an extended recovery period.“It’s clear this is going to be a long process. Just the extent of the damage, the number of homes that were destroyed, the businesses, schools – three schools were impacted, one was completely demolished. Just considering the amount of time needed to rebuild neighborhoods that are completely gone, the time needed to bring that infrastructure back … there’s a long road ahead for people to make the decision whether they’re going to rebuild.“But,” he added, “Oklahomans are very resilient; they’ve been through tragedy before. These are hearty folks who stick together and help each other out. We’re blessed to have people committed to do whatever is needed.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Chad Stanford says: Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group May 23, 2013 at 1:48 pm From what I’ve read those Senators , along with others, were not objecting to money going for Sandy relief but objected to the way it was being financed. I don’t know about you but I live on an extremely tight budget and if I chose to spend money in one place, I must cut somewhere else.I pray for those in Oklahoma, as I did and do for those who suffered because of Sandy and any other natural disaster. I also pray that I am always willing to reach out to help those in need from such disasters, even if all I can offer is compassion. I pray that someday (hopefully sooner rather than later) we can rise above our pettiness which makes all our lives more difficult than they need to be and causes so much pain. Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Anne Tumilty + says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Oklahoma: A global outpouring of support, and a long road to recovery Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Dianne Phibbs says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (5) Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ May 22, 2013 at 5:38 pm Yes, and I’m glad that Jesus rose above the political powers of his day and chose merely to love and serve people, consequences of how that affected the economics of his day be damned. If we could only learn to do the same with the aim of our compassion and social justice, perhaps we could then become more like the Kingdom of God instead of the Kingdom of Self. Your punishing of the 2 OK senators may be your political right, and I don’t fault you for doing so if that is how you truly feel, but I would also hope that our Christian conviction to help those who need our compassion and, frankly, monetary support in a time like this would override any political view we may have of our elected officials. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

Santa Barbara: ‘Resilience in the face of violence’

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Diocese of Los Angeles Episcopal News] Southland Episcopalians from Santa Barbara to Irvine were among thousands who gathered May 27 to remember and to honor six college students who were killed and 13 others who were injured during a deadly May 23 rampage in Isla Vista.One of the many tributes to the murdered in Isla Vista, California. Photo: Nicole Janelle via FacebookThe Rev. Nicole Janelle, vicar and chaplain of St. Michael’s University Church and the Episcopal campus ministry at the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), offered a final benediction to about 16,000 people at a Tuesday afternoon memorial service at the university’s Harder Stadium.Invoking a spirit of healing and solace, strength and unity, Janelle called for “resilience in the face of violence and the courage to face that violence with resolve.”“May we embrace our work as peacemakers, helping to nurture a culture of respect and loving compassion and a culture where there is ‘not one more’ in our community and in our world,” she added, echoing a rousing chant initiated by Richard Martinez, father of one of the victims, Christopher Michaels-Martinez, who also addressed the gathering.He urged mourners to shout chant loudly enough, until Washington lawmakers could hear the cry of “not one more” senseless gun death.Martinez and other UCSB students died when a local community college student, Elliot Rodger, embarked upon self-described “retribution” for feeling rejected by female students. Rodger detailed his intentions to target a UCSB sorority in a video and a “manifesto” posted on YouTube.After fatally stabbing Cheng Yuan Hong, 20; George Chen, 19; and Weihan Wang, 20, Rodger shot and killed Veronika Weiss, 19; Katie Cooper, 22; and Michaels-Martinez, 20. Rodger continued his shooting spree and rammed others with his vehicle as he drove erratically across campus before dying of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot.Irvine vigil: cherishing life, standing in solidarityStudents, staff and faculty at the UC-Irvine campus also organized an 8 p.m. vigil on Tuesday to express solidarity with the UCSB campus, according to the Rev. Hsin-Fen Chang, Episcopal chaplain.The emotional vigil was “an opportunity for UCI students to gather and to honor the victims and to pray for their families and also for those who were injured,” said Chang.She cancelled a regular bible study so that participants could attend the gathering, characterized by several speakers as an opportunity to cherish both life and one another, she said.The gathering of about 500 also included several moments of silence in honor of the victims and their families. Many of the UCI students knew and recalled memories of the victims, she added. University officials offered counseling and other grief and wellness resources to students.The Rev. Jim Lee, chair of the UCI Asian American Studies Department, said he taught at UCSB from 2004 to 2009, and has heard from colleagues who needed to talk about their grief.“I’ve been keeping in touch with folks via social media and in many ways,” Lee told The Episcopal News. “I got a call from a former colleague wanting to reflect with me how he should respond to his class of 300 students; how does he engage students today on an official day of mourning where classes are canceled but the faculty is invited to be on campus to be available to students.”He said that the community needs time to grieve before actively engaging some of the analysis already underway on social media regarding Rodger’s motives and background. Rodger had a history of mental and emotional difficulties and in April concerned family members had requested that local sheriffs conduct a welfare check on him. Sheriffs reportedly found nothing amiss.“In a lot of ways, many of my non-UCSB-related people on Facebook and the like have been trying to reflect on how Mr. Rodger’s race and gender and his misogynistic rants in both the video and manifesto reflected deeper problems with misogyny and violence against women,” Lee told the Episcopal News.University of California Santa Barbara students meet in a candlelight vigil May 24. Photo: Nicole Janelle via Facebook“My sense in conversations online with UCSB is, let’s not so much displace those questions or conversations but let’s bring to the fore the very real pain the folks are feeling in Santa Barbara.“There’s a much more visceral response that wants to rally to make grieving central to that, at least as an initial response,” Lee said. “From my observations of UCSB, they’re trying to hold both as much space for grief, empathy and the like before going through any kind of social analysis.”In Isla Vista, Janelle and others said the usually lively oceanside campus has been uncharacteristically quiet and somber and students spent Tuesday, a designated “day of mourning,” seeking solace and comfort in small groups.Brian Granger, 43, a doctoral student in theatre who sings in St. Michael’s choir, said that a former student visiting from Los Angeles, identified as “Matt” on Facebook, was among those wounded in the shootings.“He had gone to grab a drink and was standing next to someone who was killed on the spot,” Granger said. “He ducked behind a car and then ran into a nearby shop. When he got there he realized it was hard for him to move and at that moment, realized he was shot,” Granger said. The injuries were not life-threatening and following surgery his friend was released from the hospital on May 27.Granger said the memorial service helped to begin the healing process and added that St. Michael’s “immediately opened the doors of the church and they’re still open. And we put signs up so people knew they could come and meditate or pray.”Students, staff and faculty at UCLA also gathered to mourn and to show support in the wake of the violence. A candlelight vigil is planned for 8 p.m. May 28 at UC Riverside and the public is invited to attend.Janelle said that a peace labyrinth, already under construction, will be dedicated on May 31 at St. Michael’s.During the church’s regular Monday evening dinner for the homeless, participants lined up to paint “peace rocks” for the labyrinth. “We’re using that to create an activity to honor what’s happened in the last few days,” Janelle said.— The Rev. Pat McCaughan writes for the Diocese of Los Angeles’ Episcopal News. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rev. Charles Uhlik says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments (1) The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY May 29, 2014 at 5:18 pm My prayers are with those parents who have lost their children to this very senseless violence. I am also praying for the families that have been victimized by this young man who was so filled with rage towards people and especially women. When will we wake up to this needless violence that the constitution did not intend.Let us pray for dear God for peace in all our hearts.Amen. Rector Shreveport, LA By PatMcCaughanPosted May 29, 2014 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Santa Barbara: ‘Resilience in the face of violence’ Episcopalians join memorial services, vigils to honor victims Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more

RIP: Retired New York Vicar Bishop Don Taylor dies at…

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Posted May 27, 2014 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Tags May 27, 2014 at 6:30 pm Our Church has lost a great Father in God who was so very faithful to his call. Bishop E. Don Taylor exemplied what it was to be a Bishop of the Church by his common touch and care for the people of God whom he met everywhere.We extend our prayerful and sincere condolences to his daughter, Tara, whom he loved dearly and pray God’s abiding presence and grace upon her.May Bishop Taylor’s soul rest in peace.Fr. & Mrs. E. Ulric Commissiong-Jones1Rivishi StreetTown of CalliaquaSt. Vincent & the GrenadinesRetired Rector,St. James the Less Episcopal Church, Queens, NYDiocese of Long Island Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments (10) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York May 27, 2014 at 5:44 pm Sincere and profound sympathy to the whole family. C. David Williams+ The Rev. Fr. E. Ulric C-Jones says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rick Britton says: Rector Albany, NY The MOST REVEREND NICHOLAS ACRES says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Obituary, RIP: Retired New York Vicar Bishop Don Taylor dies at 77 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rev. Canon Dr. G. Llewellyn Armstrong says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA January 14, 2017 at 11:13 am Rest in peace WELL DONE!BISHOP NICHOLAS ARTHUR ACRES OCR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Rev. Dr. C. David Williams says: May 29, 2014 at 12:01 am Bishop Don Taylor was, and will remain, a blessed example of Christ’s love residing inside a man and then being spread to every human being that man meets.All of us who heard his inspired preaching will always remember how those words led us closer to our Lord Jesus Christ. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET George Kooney says: Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL People Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT June 2, 2014 at 5:05 pm Rest in Peace, Good and Faithful Servant! Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME May 29, 2014 at 6:54 am Bishop Don Taylor led a vestry retreat for us over ten years ago that we all still remember. His preaching here at Christ Church, especially to the little children, captured all of our hearts. I pray for more loving and faithful witnesses and leaders like Bp Taylor.May he rest in God’s eternal peace.Fr Stuart KenworthyRector, Christ Church, GeorgetownWashington DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ May 28, 2014 at 8:51 am It has been and will continue to be important to have role models whose example in life can help to guide the lives of others.Let your light shine so that others may see and be guided. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR June 4, 2014 at 12:23 am The Rt. Rev. E. Don Taylor was a good priest, and prince of a man, who has gone home to be with God. His life and work remains as a wonderful witness, and testimony, to his love for our church; the parishes and places he served well, and indeed all of us who got to know him down through the years. He will be sorely missed. “May his soul rest in peace and, someday rise in glory with our Lord Jesus.” Amen. June 4, 2014 at 7:52 am I should like to extend to the family of the late Rt. Rev. E. Don Taylor my sympathy and assurance of my prayers for you. I first met Bishop Taylor in 1962, soon after his ordination to the priesthood, when he was serving at St.Mary’s, Kingston. He was very helpful to me as I ran a Youth Camp at the time of Jamaica’s Independence. I have always thanked God for his affable personality and personal friendship through the years. He has served the Lord faithfully as a good Pastor. May God be praised for that. May his soul rest in peace and rise in Glory. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 May 28, 2014 at 1:41 pm In addition to his pastoral gifts, Don Taylor was a saint and mentor to many of us in the ministry. He will be missed but his legacy will continue among us whose lives he touched. He and his family are in our prayers for God’s peace, strength and joy that abides in the promise of the resurrection for eternal life and love through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. The Rev. Dr. Raleigh Daniel Hairston says: Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Fr Stuart Kenworthy says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books [Episcopal Diocese of New York] Announcing the death of retired Vicar Bishop of New York, the Rt. Rev. E. Don Taylor, Bishop Andy Dietsche wrote:Retired New York Vicar Bishop Don Taylor dies at 77. Photo: Diocese of New YorkBishop Taylor suffered a stroke in February and had pursued faithfully a long and difficult process towards recovery. This past week, however, his body began to fail, and he was admitted to the ICU of Phelps Memorial Hospital in Sleepy Hollow. He died last Saturday, May 24, 2014, with his daughter Tara and other members of his family by his side.Bishop Taylor held the distinction of being the first West Indian to become a Bishop in The Episcopal Church. Born and raised in Jamaica, he was ordained a priest in 1961 and began a ministry at St. Mary the Virgin, then a small mission in Kingston, Jamaica. In 1970, he left a flourishing congregation to take up his next appointment as Headmaster of Kingston College. He came to the United State in 1973 and served communities in Buffalo and Atlanta for some 14 years, until election in 1987 as Bishop of the Virgin Islands. As Bishop, his strong pastoral ministry contributed to significant church growth. A former radio announcer, he established a Diocesan Radio Studio and proclaimed the gospel in weekly broadcasts.In 1994, Bishop Taylor returned to the United States mainland to assume duties as Assistant Bishop in this diocese, in the newly created position of Vicar Bishop for New York City, an area covering Staten Island, Manhattan and the Bronx.  Bishop Taylor was especially beloved for his pastoral ministry and his commitment to promoting community development. Always he cared most about the people he served. “I haven’t done spectacular things, haven’t raised millions of dollars,” Bishop Taylor once said about his ministry as Vicar Bishop. “I’ve just tried to be a faithful, loving and caring bishop.”Upon his retirement, he answered the call to serve, once again, in his homeland and in 2009, he was appointed Rector of the Church of St. Thomas the Apostle, more widely known as the Kingston Parish Church, in the Diocese of Jamaica and the Cayman Islands.I wish again to express my profound gratitude to the clergy and lay leaders of our diocese who, in these last weeks since his stroke, visited Bishop Taylor and joined me in pastoral and sacramental ministry. Many of you offered care and companionship to Bishop Taylor in his journey towards God, expressing the love of this diocese for him.  I will add personally that it was my great pleasure to work as friend and colleague with Don on the staff of this diocese through the last ten years of his ministry here.  Nothing could be clearer than that he loved being a bishop, and his service to and ministry in this diocese was always characterized by the broad, infectious smile and deep laugh that signaled the profound joy at the center of his being.  He also served as a visible link to the Anglican Church in Jamaica and throughout the West Indies for the great number of Caribbean-American Episcopalians in the Diocese of New York.  In this last season of his life, I had the privilege to come to him as a brother bishop, and I am confident that I speak for Bishops Sisk, Grein, Roskam and Donovan, all of whom shared episcopal ministry with Don in New York, in expressing our sorrow at his passing, our love for him, and our respect for the legacy he built in the ongoing life of this our diocese.Letters and cards of condolence may be sent to his daughter:Tara Taylor195-04 90th AvenueJamaica, NY 11423Please continue to remember our brother at your altars, commending him to God’s surpassing peace, abiding love and complete joy. Pray, also, for Tara, Bishop Taylor’s family, and all within the wider church who mourn.” Alva Griffith says: Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN James Cox says: last_img read more